Robert Hole, Jr

Biology is my life.

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  • Profile picture of Katja Schulz who took this action.

    Katja Schulz commented on "Taxon Page Cleaning Crew":

    @Maggie Whitson: I put this on our list of taxon concepts to be merged. Once this is done, there will be only a single Physocarpus opulifolius page covering the various author combinations.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Maggie Whitson who took this action.

    Maggie Whitson commented on "Taxon Page Cleaning Crew":

    If you do a search for "Telamonia" you get a bunch of mushrooms and one jumping spider, because apparently two different genera have the same name.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Maggie Whitson who took this action.

    Maggie Whitson commented on "Taxon Page Cleaning Crew":

    There are no images under Physocarpus opulifolius (L.) Maxim. (the species concept used by the USDA) (ok, there is now one I added) because the images posted under Physocarpus were all labeled with either different author citations (like Physocarpus opulifolius Maxim ex Koehne ) or with something like Physocarpus opulifolius (L.) Maxim., orth. cons.). This is very confusing when you look for our common southeastern US species and find nothing. I suspect anyone who's contributed P. opulifolius photos is using a modern concept, not some antique synonym. All our P. opulifolius photos should probably at least have an association with Physocarpus opulifolius (L.) Maxim.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Robert Guralnick who took this action.

    Robert Guralnick commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    @Bart C.: Hi Bart, I am one of the people helping to build Map of Life. I wanted to thank you for taking the time to learn about the project and what we hope to accomplish. I think you and Rod have done about as good job as anyone covering the aspirations of the project. Perhaps one missing piece in the discussions below regarding data types is that we see a very high value to species checklists from local area inventories. We have a fair amount of such checklist data already in Map of Life, and more data of that type will be coming.

    With regards to your excellent question about our intents to work with providers, we are VERY actively seeking partnerships, which is ongoing work that we take very seriously. We are making inroads here, and our small but committed group of scientists and developers are in this for the long haul. Both myself and the lead on the project from Yale, Walter Jetz, are deeply passionate and committed to this endeavor and we both have long standing interests in biogeographical questions in places where our knowledge has the most gaps (Southern hemisphere in particular). The process with working with providers, and doing it _carefully_ so that institutions, datasets and records are well described, cited and linkable back to the source, is slow but meaningful work. We have many pragmatic plans for linkages, integration and continuing to provide value to providers, and of course to those who are interested in using Map of Life. I'd be happy to share more about this if interested.

    A final note: We are definitely excited about, and have had ongoing discussions, with field-based citizen science projects. Within Map of Life itself, we have a strong interest in refining range maps based on bringing together these different sources of data. In particular, every time we overlay point occurrences and range maps, we notice inconsistencies. We will be providing soon tools for spatial editing and annotations. This is more a "classification" problem akin to citizen science efforts happening in the Zooniverse, than the field-side, but likely as important. I hope this makes sense. Questions welcome!

    over 2 years ago • edited: over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Roderic Page who took this action.

    Roderic Page commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    @Bart C.: Rob Guralnick and colleagues will be better placed than I to comment, but my understanding is that Mapping Life is indeed aiming to synthesise distributional data from a wide variety of sources, including point observations (which is typically what crowd-sourcing observation sites record) to the polygons used by projects such as the IUCN Redlist (where the data consist of inferred distributions of taxa based on published records, expert opinions and, I suspect, guesswork).

    Note that crowd-sourcing has its own biases, see for example Where is the "crowd" in crowdsourcing? Mapping EOL Flickr photos.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Bart C. who took this action.

    Bart C. commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    @Bart C.: Had some time now to dig a little more into Map of Life and try their beta release at http://www.mappinglife.org/ and scanned their publication. It confirms more or less what I was hoping for. In the first place it will strive to gather all known distribution data and provide tools scientists and the general public can use to really understand and work with those data. To model trends, find knowledge gaps, etc. It will be less of a crowd-sourcing tool itself, but more a website that brings data together from different projects, including potentially crowd-sourcing projects like Inaturalist and Observado, although these kind of data are not implemented yet. Which is even more interesting is, if I understand correctly, that they will also develop ways to compare data from one initative to the other and help eachother to verify data. All looks promising and very exiting stuff, but I still hope they won't wait for data to come to them but actively seek all possible providers, including those ones from continental Europe and other parts of the world outside the Anglesaksen countries. With respect to crowd-sourcing initiatives I not only know of Observado but also have seen initiatives in Germany and Nordic countries which could add valuable information, but all with small budgets and hence lousy PR. I am sure there are also possiblilities in Russia, China, Japan, etc. All step by step of course and with many challenges. But my suggestion would be that somebody needs to work on this actively, not just on the sideline, otherwise you will still have a very biased (Anglesaksen/Western) knowledge of the world compared to the total human knowledge. Although, to have no such bias is utopia I guess. Maybe via GBIF?? Sorry if this long discussion seems somewhat off topic, I had to put my thoughts down and like to hear what views on the big picture are circulating in the professional world, as I am just considering myself an amateur.

    over 2 years ago • edited: over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Cyndy Parr who took this action.

    Cyndy Parr commented on "EOL Curators":

    Folks, I want to apologize for those of you who are trying to change your notification settings so you don't get so many messages from this discussion group or EOL in general. The password reset mail is often caught in spam filters and we're working to try to fix that. In the meantime, please use the "Contact us" link at the bottom of the page to send a message relating to Membership and Registration and we'll be happy to adjust things for you.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Bart C. who took this action.

    Bart C. commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    Can anybody enlighten me about the big picture in creating Map of Life? Apparently supported by eol (see for instance http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2012-05/new-map-life-see-where-everything-lives-earth-google-maps). The same concept of plotting data on google maps (or similar) already exists for about 5 years (actually for bird sightings within The Netherlands they already use this for about 10 years now). Is Map of Life the project that will join all data they propose (museums, local checklists and research institutions, published studies and global groups like the World Wildlife Fund) +GBIF, and verified data from Inaturalist, observado.org, project noah, Ispot, etc.? Please tell me this initiative is going to actively seek collaboration with above and other organizations to put everything together. Or is this just going to be one in a dozen that thinks that everybody with data to share will be swarming to them because they have the ‘unique’ concept, but end up with just some little part of the data sources? If it is the last case, please pull back your resources. More competition is a waste of time. Real efforts to bring everything together would be so much powerful. Why can’t those museums, research institutions and WWF join and extend something that already exists, like Inaturalist as it is already a partner of EOL? I am used to observado.org by the way and I am not planning to do effort to import and share this with Inaturalist or any other organization, except maybe some pictures via Flickr for EOL ;).

    over 2 years ago • edited: over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Amy Chang who took this action.
  • Profile picture of Amy Chang who took this action.
    Amy Chang added an unknown item to the collection "High priority taxa without images".

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Amy Chang who took this action.
    Amy Chang added "Trichopus zeylanicus Gaertn." to the collection "Help needed".

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Amy Chang who took this action.
    Amy Chang added "Saussurea costus (Falc.) Lipsch." to the collection "Help needed".

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Amy Chang who took this action.
    Amy Chang added "Onosma bracteatum Wall." to the collection "Help needed".

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Amy Chang who took this action.
    Amy Chang added "Cistanche deserticola Ma" to the collection "Help needed".

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Amy Chang who took this action.
    Amy Chang added an unknown item to the collection "Help needed".

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Katja Schulz who took this action.

    Katja Schulz commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Michаel Frаnkis: It looks like Wikimedia Commons was last harvested on 3 July. Usually it gets refreshed more frequently, but I know it's a tricky harvest that often needs manual intervention. Our content important team is currently short-handed and in the middle of a big project with global partners. So it's possible that harvesting of complicated resources is a little slower than usual.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Michаel Frаnkis who took this action.

    Michаel Frаnkis commented on "EOL Curators":

    Problems with Wiki Commons harvest?

    There's been no new harvest of pics from Wiki Commons since 21 June; pics added to Commons pages on 22 June and subsequently have not appeared here yet. Is there a particular known problem causing this?

    over 2 years ago • edited: over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Katja Schulz who took this action.

    Katja Schulz commented on "EOL Curators":

    Just to clarify things for people who are not familiar with all those abbreviations: CC refers to creative commons licenses, which are required for all EOL content that is not in the public domain; NC refers to the non-commercial restriction which is compatible with the EOL licensing policy; ND refers to the no derivatives restriction, which prevents others from re-using the content in the creation of new, related works. The ND restriction is not compatible with the EOL licensing policy. All creative commons licenses require attribution, so credit for the creator of the original work is always assured.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Cyndy Parr who took this action.

    Cyndy Parr commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Robert Guralnick: NC is allowed (for better or worse), but ND is not.

    over 2 years ago