David Eickhoff

Native Hawaiian Plant Specialist

The EOL Profile Newsfeed contains comments left for its owner by other members, EOL Community invitations, and gathers updates associated with the items in the owner's EOL watch list.

Add a new comment

  • Profile picture of Yan Wong who took this action.

    Yan Wong commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Jeremy Rice: Ah, great, thanks. Apologies for posting this in curators, BTW, I intended to post it in EoL API discussion group: http://eol.org/communities/121/newsfeed

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Jeremy Rice who took this action.

    Jeremy Rice commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Katja Schulz: As KS said, it actually *is* available; it's 1347. It just has a funny name, so you cannot tell. ...But that's really the hierarchy.

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Katja Schulz who took this action.

    Katja Schulz commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Yan Wong: oh, and if it helps in the meantime, the current hierarchy id for IRMNG is 1347, so you should be able to get the root taxa like this: http://eol.org/api/hierarchies/1.0/1347.json?cache_ttl=

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Katja Schulz who took this action.

    Katja Schulz commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Yan Wong: It looks like this is a bug. IRMNG is supposed to be supported as a hierarchy provider. I'll report it. Hopefully, it will be an easy fix.

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Yan Wong who took this action.

    Yan Wong commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Bob Corrigan: Here's another example where the image is currently the exemplar, even though the discussion on the page implies a different exemplar was deliberately set: http://eol.org/data_objects/26853984

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Yan Wong who took this action.

    Yan Wong commented on "EOL Curators":

    Any idea why IRMNG isn't supported as a hierarchy provider in http://eol.org/api/docs/provider_hierarchies ? I'm trying to map OpenTree identifiers onto EoL page IDs (http://eol.org/forums/8/topics/93/posts/306) and it seems if I use GBIF, NCBI, IndexFungorum and IRMNG, I can find 99.97 % of the OpenTree species on EoL.

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Deniz Martinez who took this action.

    Deniz Martinez added the Hawaiian common name "ʻapapane" to "Himatione sanguinea (Gmelin, 1788)".

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Deniz Martinez who took this action.

    Deniz Martinez marked the Catalan common name "Apapane" from "Himatione sanguinea (Gmelin, 1788)" as untrusted.

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Deniz Martinez who took this action.

    Deniz Martinez marked the English common name "Laysan Honeycreeper" from "Himatione sanguinea (Gmelin, 1788)" as trusted.

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Deniz Martinez who took this action.

    Deniz Martinez marked the English common name "Laysan Honeycreeper" from "Himatione sanguinea (Gmelin, 1788)" as trusted.

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Deniz Martinez who took this action.

    Deniz Martinez added the Hawaiian common name "Hawaiʻi ʻōʻō" to "Moho nobilis (Merrem, 1786)".

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Deniz Martinez who took this action.

    Deniz Martinez marked the English common name "Hawaii O-O" from "Moho nobilis (Merrem, 1786)" as untrusted.

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Deniz Martinez who took this action.

    Deniz Martinez added the Hawaiian common name "ʻōʻō" to "Moho".

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Deniz Martinez who took this action.

    Deniz Martinez marked the English common name "'o'os" from "Moho" as trusted.

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Bob Corrigan who took this action.

    Bob Corrigan commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Michаel Frаnkis: Michael and Kate - I'm reluctant to make blanket statements, but I can safely say that you and other curators should always exercise your best judgment when choosing photos. Where a choice exists, I would invite you to choose a photo that embraces both scientific accuracy and aesthetic quality. Per Michael's comment in para3, this is information we would very much like to see associated with taxon pages - let's talk about the best way to do that. ***As always, thanks for everything you do for EOL***

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Michаel Frаnkis who took this action.

    Michаel Frаnkis commented on "EOL Curators":

    I'd say we should select known wild origin, 100% of the time. Species in captivity / cultivation are frequently hybrids, or misidentified, often atypical, and do not show the taxon in its natural environment. Even where the species (as currently defined) may be obvious, subspecies usually won't be known; this leads to problems with time as subspecies are shown by further research to be distinct species, and the photos change from 'species identified' to 'unidentified'.

    Case in point: the Ptilopsis owls of Africa. These were formerly regarded as a single species, Ptilopsis leucotis, but this was recently split into two species, Ptilopsis leucotis in the northern subtropics, and Ptilopsis granti in the southern subtropics. The two species are easily identified in the wild by location and vocally, but are visually indistinguishable. Ptilopsis owls are common in captivity, and most are labelled Ptilopsis leucotis, though many (most?) of them are actually likely to be Ptilopsis granti due to its greater accessibility to markets. So captive specimens of Ptilopsis are not identifiable, and quite simply can't be trusted.

    To draw a similar parallel, directly relevant to what you say: we have a few photos from the wild of Ailurus fulgens which are of mediocre photographic quality (camera trap results), and dozens of photos from zoos, many of high photographic quality. But not one of the zoo photos is identified to either source location or to subspecies (A. f. fulgens in the Himalaya, A. f. styani in SW China). If future research shows a deep genetic divide between the two subspecies (or even between other as-yet un-named populations) and thus a species split (very possible, even likely, given the barriers to migration in the deep valleys of the area), then every single one of those zoo photos becomes worthless as just unidentified Ailurus sp. (as they already are unidentifiable to subspecies), and might as well be deleted.

    This can even affect species which one might think to be no-brainer identifications: how many captive specimens of Loxodonta africana might actually turn out to be Loxodonta cyclotis misnamed? Answer: probably not many, but we don't, and effectively can't, know precisely.

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Kate Markham who took this action.

    Kate Markham commented on "EOL Curators":

    I have a question concerning choosing exemplar photos. I know EOL values photos of the species in the wild vs photos of the species in captivity. I'd say 85-95% of the time, this completely makes sense. But I've come across a few pages/collections of photos where there is a limited number of photos taken in the wild, those photos aren't great (far away, species is partially obstructed from view, etc), and the photos of the species in captivity are of much better quality, meaning I can immediately identify the animal, I see distinguishing physical traits, and so forth. Is it acceptable to select those photos as exemplar? Or should we stick to the wild ones? My thought is, if the photo is a much better example of the species, and assuming that not all viewers look through the photos available, it might be a good idea to use photos of the animal in captivity in these cases.

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Bob Corrigan who took this action.

    Bob Corrigan commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Michаel Frаnkis: Michael and Yan - we're on the case. Thanks for the very comprehensive description of the problem. We take curation issues very seriously, and will look to come up with a useful approach to addressing this problem. Thanks - bob

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Michаel Frаnkis who took this action.

    Michаel Frаnkis commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Yan Wong: Could well be. We'll have to wait for info from those 'In the know'.

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Yan Wong who took this action.

    Yan Wong commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Michаel Frаnkis: I wonder if the exemplar status is being reset when the images are reharvested, and given a new data object ID?

    about 1 month ago