Kathy Hill

Cicada researcher

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  • Profile picture of Steve Baskauf who took this action.

    Steve Baskauf commented on "EOL Curators":

    Well, what you are saying makes sense. However, one's position on this issue depends somewhat on what one believes about the purpose of providing common names in a reference. If one believes that a centralized body should decide on the proper common names for species and that everyone should use those names (e.g. as is generally the case for bird species where a governing body puts out a list of standardized common names), then perhaps your approach should be adopted. On the other hand, if one believes that the purpose of listing common names is to report what people actually call the taxon, then it doesn't really matter what we think is the most sensible way to list a name. What matters is how one finds it being used. Unlike birds, there is no centralized body that decides what common names should be used for plants. Subsequently there may be several common names for a single species of plant as well as different regional names. For example, in some places, Euonymus americanus is called "strawberry bush". However, in the area where I live, the most typical common name is "hearts a-bustin' with love" or just "hearts a-bustin' ". How does one render that according to rules? No one has actually appointed Encyclopedia of Life or EOL curators to decide the proper way to render common names.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of tony rebelo who took this action.

    tony rebelo commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Jamie McMillan: I concur. The issue of names being Proper Names or collective names is an issue I too feel strongly about. To my mind a Proper Name: the name that refers specifically to a special species is the same as a persons name: it should be capitalized and cannot be genitive. What is a white green fly? It could be anything. But White Greenfly alerts me immediately that this refers to a special species (or genus) that probably has a scientific name. I go a bit further than you though. Great Crested Grebe is still too descriptive. Why not Greatcrest Grebe if it has a large crest or Great Crest Grebe if it is the larger of a group of Grebes with crests. And certainly it is Burchells Coucal - it is named after Burchell and does not belong to him, so Burchell's Coucal is wrong. But I am amazed at the vehement criticism I get when I vehemently try forcing my views on the matter ..

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Jamie McMillan who took this action.

    Jamie McMillan commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Michаel Frаnkis: I am a great capital letter fan and have tried to do this in my wildlife travel company http://www.naturalist.co.uk/ (just for ref -not and advert!). But several of my tour leaders are also journalists and it has taken a long time to persuade them to capitalise. My reasoning is that when someone writes 'I saw a little ringed plover' do they mean a small Greater Ringed Plover, a small Ringed Plover whose species they couldn't quite determine, or a species named Little Ringed Plover? Caps make it clear at once. The other big confusion that might have already been mentioned is hyphenation. A Great Crested Grebe means a large grebe with a crest. A Great-crested Grebe would mean a grebe of any size with a large crest. A Great Crested-grebe would mean a large species of a distinctive group of grebes, all with crests. Hope this helps.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Rachel Berquist who took this action.
    Rachel Berquist joined the community "Scratchpads Community".

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Jennifer Hammock who took this action.

    Jennifer Hammock commented on "EOL Curators":

    Calling ecologists and conservation biologists with a little time and expertise to spare: our colleagues at the Encyclopedia of Earth are looking for a few good editors. The Encyclopedia of Earth is an electronic reference about the Earth, its natural environments, and their interaction with society. It was an important contributor of material for EOL's new Topics in Biodiversity articles. If you can review articles on broad topics in ecology, conservation biology or environmental science, please register with them as a topic editor. Your work on EoE may also be re-purposed on EOL and other open access venues. Thanks!

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Jennifer Hammock who took this action.
    Jennifer Hammock added "José R Ferrer-Paris" as a manager of the community "Rubenstein Fellows".

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of José R Ferrer-Paris who took this action.
    José R Ferrer-Paris joined the community "Rubenstein Fellows".

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Katja Schulz who took this action.

    Katja Schulz commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Deniz Martinez: A "change image type to map" tool is on our list of features to develop in the future. For now, there's a collection for images that need to be moved to the maps tab. I have made both of you managers of that collection, so you can add images that need to be retagged.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Katerina Tvardikova who took this action.

    Katerina Tvardikova commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Deniz Martinez: Hi, I have the same problem, as I have a mpa of distribution for all birds. I only changed description, and left in in pictures with comment. However, I am not sure whether it is okay.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Deniz Martinez who took this action.

    Deniz Martinez commented on "EOL Curators":

    What (if anything) should be done with maps that are in the images section? I have run into lot of these. Is there a way to move them to the maps tab, or should a comment be left, or anything at all? Thanks!

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Katja Schulz who took this action.

    Katja Schulz commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    @Deniz Martinez: Unfortunately, grabbing images from Wikimedia Commons is a bit of a gnarly affair for us. Here's a page that explains the harvesting conditions: http://eol.org/info/curate_wiki#commons I had a look at the image you want to have imported, and it turns out that it was not yet in the Cavia aperea gallery. I have put it there, and it should get imported with our next harvest, which will probably happen sometime next week.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Deniz Martinez who took this action.

    Deniz Martinez commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    Hello! I am new to EOL and to curating, and have already run into my first problem. :) I found an image on WikiCommons that is not on the species page here on EOL, and am unsure how to fix it so that it harvests. Here is the link: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cuis_com%C3%BAn_(Cavia_aperea),_Tierpark_Hellabrunn,_M%C3%BAnich,_Alemania,_2012-06-17,_DD_01.JPG#filehistory I can see that there is obviously some incorrect info in the description (not an ostrich LOL!), but the license is good and it does link to its category page (just not the gallery). Thanks!

    over 2 years ago • edited: over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Deniz Martinez who took this action.
    Deniz Martinez joined the community "EOL Discussion Group".

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Michаel Frаnkis who took this action.

    Michаel Frаnkis commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Katja Schulz: "Accommodating the rules of all the languages we aim to support is a work in progress . . . . So providing us with information in a particular language and explaining the rules, as you are doing, is the best way to help us prioritize development efforts to support that language"

    For English, there are no definitive rules, but the strong modern trend is for all formal species names to have the first letter of each separate word capitalised (i.e., after spaces, but not after hyphens):
    European Golden Plover
    Common Honey-buzzard
    Purple Hairstreak
    Honey Bee
    Stag's-horn Clubmoss
    Rough-leaved Globe-thistle

    There are still some reactionaries who insist that everything must be decapitalised, unless the name is derived from a proper noun, but they never say how one determines whether a word is so derived or not (nor why one should have to do so), nor have any answer to the ugliness of having lists with mixed 'superior' Capital Species and 'inferior' lower-case species.

    over 2 years ago • edited: over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Katja Schulz who took this action.

    Katja Schulz commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Hans-Martin Braun: Accommodating the rules of all the languages we aim to support is a work in progress. As we accumulate more content in particular languages, we'll try to catch up with interface adjustments to improve the presentation in each of these languages. So providing us with information in a particular language and explaining the rules, as you are doing, is the best way to help us prioritize development efforts to support that language.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Hans-Martin Braun who took this action.

    Hans-Martin Braun commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Jamie McMillan: I think the question has been settled. But there is another problem. In German all words of biological vernacular names are capitalised. That's a general rule. So why not integrate that rule into the programming like you did with English names?

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Jamie McMillan who took this action.

    Jamie McMillan commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Katja Schulz: Sorry Katya, missed your comment about which taxon I was commenting on (having added a wrong machine tag), and I have forgotten now! I thought I had solved the issue just by changing the machine tag. If I remember I'll check the images again.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Sarah Gronim who took this action.
    Sarah Gronim joined the community "EOL Discussion Group".

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Cyndy Parr who took this action.

    Cyndy Parr commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Alexa DiNicola: Thanks, pay special attention to the Flickr and the Wikimedia Commons images and where appropriate give high ratings or set examplars. Many of them are better than the images we have from other sources.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Alexa DiNicola who took this action.

    Alexa DiNicola commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Cyndy Parr: I can review some of those, especially the western-USA species. I'll get to it shortly.

    over 2 years ago