Nancy Landrum

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    Nancy Landrum commented on an older version of Communication and Perception:

    My Blue Jay mocks crows and telephones. He also makes a soft repetitive chortle when he is waiting for a treat or attention.

    over 4 years ago

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    Nancy Landrum commented on "Image of Felis silvestris silvestris":

    Incredible.

    almost 5 years ago • edited: over 3 years ago

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    Nancy Landrum commented on an older version of File:Wolf Zoo Berlin.jpg:

    What a gift of nature. I think I'm in love.

    almost 5 years ago

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    Nancy Landrum commented on an older version of File:Kuscheln.jpg:

    I met a Dingo at a local zoo back in the day, and he was confined to a small cage. I think I made a kissy kissy sound at him, like I do to my dogs, and I think as long as he lived he dreamed about killing me. I've never seen any animal get so mad. I must be offensive or smelled like other dogs, although the same zoo had a female wolf in a circus cage and my husband put his hand in to pet her and she loved it so much, when he tried to withdraw his hand, she took hold of his arm with her pawed and just howled her heart out as the keepers told him he had to leave her alone. They had tried to put her in with a male, but she hated him. As we walked through the rest of of zoo, she mournfully howled and broke our hearts. She preferred my husband. He had a great time at the zoo with the lynx, the warthog and the large cats, and a Dingo wanted me dead. I felt horrible. The zoo got in trouble so it has all be redone so the animals can have the good life.

    almost 5 years ago

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    Nancy Landrum commented on an older version of Dog meets donkey:

    What a picture, kudos to the photographer and owner.

    almost 5 years ago

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    Nancy Landrum commented on an older version of Daisy4:

    Is this a fox terrier? I know he is somewhat like my son's female wire-haired stumpy legged Jack(Parson) Russel terrier. One night at her home, a block from a Chinese restaurant, Doughnut Shop and a K-Mart, she started one of her horrific bark fests and my son opened the front dog and stumpy Haley ran out and chased a coyote down the street. Yes, we live in Northern Illinois in an area of around 200,000 humans and on the local city website sandwiched in between garbage pick-ups, incarceration for having grass over ten inches, and all the other glories of our burg, was the word,"coyotes", so they have become a problem around here. About 40 miles away a bear was found. This is a state of farmland and all of these populations were supposed to be gone years ago. I never did find out if the sighting of the cougar by a middle school panned out, but this guy in the picture looks like he could take over animal control in any city.

    almost 5 years ago

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    Nancy Landrum commented on an older version of Grey Wolf:

    This looks so much like my wolf/malamute girl Boofy, who was the runt of the litter and only weighed 40.9 kilograms but she had short legs and a cobby body. When you talked to her she would sing. Her mother was only 3/4 Minnesota Timber Wolf, and I don't know what the other 1/4 was, and her Dad was a Malamute, I met both of them. We had a year-old huge red Doberman who was the grandson of one of the Magnum P.I. Dobermans, I think the one with the biggest nose. He was a handful and troublesome until we brought home our little Boofy. She gained control of him as a puppy, and totally controlled him for the rest of their lives. She over-controlled him, and a Doberman metabolism requires plenty of food. As a puppy we saw she had eaten both bowls of dog chow, and she could hardly move, and it almost looked like you could see the dog food balls lumped in her stomach. One day they escaped, and Boofy hurt her leg, and the Doberman, Stanley, stayed and protected her and we heard from the boy who found them that some man was walking his big dog and set him loose on the injured Boofy, but he never saw Stanley until he charged out of the trees and that dog ran like the wind. She would only let Stanley do what she wanted him to do. I watched one day as Stanley, who was really getting skinny, try to eat some food I fixed only for him. Boofy did her submissive posture, laying on her back with her neck exposed under his chin. He growled so loudly and pulled his lips back so far exposing his "alligator" teeth, and kept this most ferocious act up for about twenty minutes as Boofy still exposed her jugular right under his deadly jaws. And she looked so sweet. I would have stopped this if I didn't know better, Stanley was one of those typical males who would not attack his mate, but I wasn't prepared for what happened next. Poor big, red-nosed, frothing at the mouth Stanley had growled and snarled so long he started to choke. Within the blink of an eye Boofy was up and stole all his food. Boofy was the typical long-haired grey, somewhat black and white Northern Timber Wolf colors and the Doberman was red over-sized for a typical Doberman, and all their puppies came out identical black and tan and grew to look like just any old mixed breed. When I put an add in the paper telling the parentage, I had lines in front of the door. All eight puppies were gone in two hours. We kept one, and he was the most well-behaved dog I have ever seen because they lived outside and he was raised by Mom and not spoiled like I would have done to him. The feeding order was, Mother ate first, then the puppy, and lastly Stanley. We had to separate them because Stanley almost starved to death no matter how much food you put in the back yard, he was not allowed any, so he became a house dog. By this time the pup, Bowser was full grown and the situation became impossible so we did find a good home for him, so Boofy became a house dog too.

    almost 5 years ago • edited: over 3 years ago

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    Nancy Landrum commented on "Image of Heteropoda venatoria":

    I just read that this spider is from the tropical regions and has infiltrated the Southern regions of the United States, but I live in Northern Illinois near the Mississippi and their numbers are legion. My property does contain part of a ravine in a well populated area, and I have noticed color ranges from almost black to a lighter brindled. I have seen a female in the grass carrying an egg sack that looked like a shiny blue marble, but the spider was so big, maybe it was a marble. We would find them under dog houses and inside the house due to a gas line that had been moved by the previous owners leaving a perfect entrance. When I first saw one I went into shock, thinking it couldn't be real, but it was. We had built an addition on the house, and the back door that led to a small storage area did not have a good seal, or should I say the door was a little too small. The landing that leads to the basement has a large dark door, and one day on my way downstairs I saw a huge dark "Huntswoman" all covered in a web with about 20 already colored spiders surrounding her. Yes, I only did laundry once a week, I hate basements, that's how she was able to pull off this stunt. My son and I were at first terrified and then interested and then sad. Mama spider was dead, but firmly attached to the door with her blanket of web. The babies, which were on their way to their new lives, were big infants, but we managed to catch everyone and take them outside and Mama was removed and laid to rest. Does the female languish after the eggs are hatched? She was firmly attached to the door in the most purposeful way. It was sad and I thought maybe she died so they could dine on her until they could fend for themselves. No other spider could have done this, and if there was one large enough to do it, I never want to see it. Anyway, it would have eaten the young. It was a frightening sight that turned to melancholy. I don't know what a Huntsman would be doing this far north unless there is a Huntsman mimic I don't know about. But the picture is identical. One day there was one on the side of the house, and we took a coffee jar to catch her, but the ends of her legs extended past the opening, so I am amazed at the size they can attain. But I won't be afraid of them anymore, I did live with them awhile.

    almost 5 years ago

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    Nancy Landrum commented on "Image of Pholcus phalangioides":

    A wonderful closeup, of course he looks so much like all spiders here, I'm glad they I can't see their faces. I like to picture them like the spiders on Minuscule, the French insect and spider animations where they have buck teeth.

    almost 5 years ago

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    Nancy Landrum commented on "Image of Pholcus phalangioides":

    That's a perfect picture.

    almost 5 years ago

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    Nancy Landrum commented on "Image of Pholcus phalangioides":

    Good job Mommy.

    almost 5 years ago

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    Nancy Landrum commented on an older version of Image of an unknown taxon:

    A rabbit skull looks just like a pliers, and they can use them that way. That's why a three pound Eastern Cottontail can shake bi-fold doors and slam them open like he's as big as a dog, and can also, when discovered hiding on a closet shelf, hidden that is, he can pick your arm up and shake it likes it's a rattle leaving your whole arm feeling like it's a banged up funny bone. And the way they can walk up to a piece of furniture and take a perfect bite out of the corner like it was no more that a cracker. I think we're lucky there are no five hundred pound rabbits. Unless they could be trained to be used in sawmills and deforestation.

    almost 5 years ago

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    Nancy Landrum commented on an older version of File:Lepus europaeus Weinsberg 20080501.jpg:

    He looks exactly like the old German Easter figures. Perfect.

    almost 5 years ago

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    Nancy Landrum commented on an older version of Behavior:

    I remember too how Buck climbed everything he could, and would make noises. My Eastern Cottontail was silent, never thumped but did jump on everything he could.

    almost 5 years ago

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    Nancy Landrum commented on an older version of Behavior:

    I have a number of photos on your EOL images of Sylvilagus bachmani who lived free range in a home. His name was Buck.

    almost 5 years ago

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    Nancy Landrum commented on an older version of Ecosystem Roles:

    They vibrate so rapidly and look so silly, I named them clown spiders. I wonder if anyone here has seen the French animations called, Minuscule. They have a spider just like these, but they have him as an orb weaver, and you should see his face. These computer animations are done on real background and are amazing. They are available on Youtube.

    almost 5 years ago

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    Nancy Landrum commented on an older version of Lifespan/Longevity:

    I wonder if these spiders keep growing as they age, and the only deceased ones I have found are huge, relatively speaking. I have raised several generations in my home because they do wonders at keeping all other tiny critters under control. I also see these spiders living within a foot or two of another, so I figure when food is scare, they will turn on one another.

    almost 5 years ago

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    Nancy Landrum commented on an older version of Communication and Perception:

    I have watched their mating rituals too. I had a mommy spider in between the windows and the babies were already colored and were on their way to meet the world. Up in the far corner was a male who would run pretend assaults on the kids to draw the mother close to him, as she would of course charge. I watched this in my kitchen window for days until the mom felt it was time to start the cycle all over again and the did the deed right in front of my eyes. It's good the kids had mostly escaped, they didn't need to see that.

    almost 5 years ago

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    Nancy Landrum commented on an older version of Communication and Perception:

    These are the most incredible spiders on the planet. They have cleared my home of all the spiders which scare me, not to mention carpenter ants. The more of these I have the better. I have see one of these children no bigger that a pin dot attack a large jumping spider. The jumper was terrified, but the little spider retreated for a moment so I got the jumping spider off the ceiling with a broom and ushered him out the door. This little pin dot of a spider charged right for the face of the large spider, but I think he was too little even get bitten by the brute. But they are the absolute exterminators and don't charge any fees. Except I do need to sweep my ceilings frequently because they seem to trail festoons of webs wherever they go. I want to get the webs down before they collect any dirt. I have a wonderful tiled dining room that is rarely used, but I have to go out there and clean up spider poo. Yes, they leave a lot behind and I have found their leftover dinners and I know some were big spiders because I could see the fangs easily. So these are my heroes.

    almost 5 years ago

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    Nancy Landrum commented on an older version of Image of Pholcus phalangioides:

    Could this be a nursery?

    almost 5 years ago