Leo Shapiro

The EOL Profile Newsfeed contains comments left for its owner by other members, EOL Community invitations, and gathers updates associated with the items in the owner's EOL watch list.

Add a new comment

  • Profile picture of Katja Schulz who took this action.

    Katja Schulz commented on "Political Animals: 7 Ways Congress is Trying to Destroy the Endangered Species Act | Earthjustice":

    looks like we are having technical issues: [translation incomplete]

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Katja Schulz who took this action.

    Katja Schulz commented on "Political Animals: 7 Ways Congress is Trying to Destroy the Endangered Species Act | Earthjustice":

    Celeste, this text is really not suitable for an EOL taxon page. This is not a blogging platform. What we are looking for are descriptions of the taxa, not opinions on general policy.

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Celeste South who took this action.

    Celeste South commented on "Dasyurus viverrinus (Shaw, 1800)":

    @Katja Schulz: Katja....Well, my first attempt didn't work out as planned, I thought "My Insights" would have been included at the end of the aticle. Instead, I had to add my insights to the article as a reply/response. I apologize and hhope it dosn't lessen the impact of the article. If you could let me know what you think (is the article appropriate for the EOL community and is "My Insight" helpful, needed, etc. While my written insights appear in corect form (paragraphs) after I pasted it in the section, after posting, it came out as one long paragraph in the reply/response section with no known way to edit it (when I attempted to edit it, it looked perfectly fine in edit mod . I do apologize for that, as it is cumbersome to read.

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Celeste South who took this action.

    Celeste South commented on "Political Animals: 7 Ways Congress is Trying to Destroy the Endangered Species Act | Earthjustice":

    Celeste South's insight: Coming from the "inside", as an Endangered Species Recovery biologist, USFWS 20 yrs (retired only due to illness): #2 - The Service has always considered any data submitted to it regarding species location, pop numbers, etc. It is also weighed, i.e., how was the data collected, we have a standard that must be folowed, when it was collected, who and why. The oerative word here, as it has always been is "consider". Data that is collected by state, county, private companies and sent to the Service, but not utilized is simply noted and explained in the public documents. #6 - No exposure of species' locality to ilegal poaching/hunting/collecting. Such specific info is protected under law that also governs what can be legally restricted/redacted in a FOIA. . #7- One must always know the agenda of the citizen's action (as well as any organization such as EarthJustice, developer, member of Congress). During the course of my career, regarding individual citizens or snall local goups, the majority of citizens reacting to a Section 10 (take) permit application for an action, ex development of condos are NIMBYs (Not In My Back Yard). For that percentage of citizens, their agenda is clear and obvious, they had no prior interest in a listing package or Section 9, 10, never attended meetings set up by the Service to introduce themselves and their actions to the local citizens.....UNTIL the propsed action affected them. Know the agenda. Know the source, as they usually are running thier own agendas and just as in #7 above ......know/understand that agenda. EarthJustice does some amazing work, I should know, as I and the Service have been sued by them numerous times (usually regarding the Alabama/Perdido Key beach mouse under various Section 9 and 10 proposed actions). During negotiations, their primary agenda became clear, it wasn't about the beach mouse, it was about power. When asked what "we, the Service" could do for them in order to stop the litigation, the answer was simple: allow them to have a seat at the table during the listing process/allow them to provide input as to what species was to be listed and when........i.e., power (if you ask why not let them have a seat at the table, then also ask yourself where would that stop, could BP, PETA, IAW, Coal companies also have a seat?). In the end of the litigation process (because, of course the USFWS could not entertain thier asking price), however, the beach mouse still won. Because of the spot light litigation placed on the usually unnoticed beach mouse, I could always count on my requested budget for additional field studies, pop models, funds for buying tracts of habitat being fully funded. Know the true enemy of the Act.....Interstate Commerce Act. Many species do not fall under that specific act, yet it was the Constitutional catalyst/umbrella that allowed for the ESA to be passed back in the early 70's. It has always been its Acheilles heel and that needs to be fixed.

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Celeste South who took this action.

    Celeste South added a link to "Political Animals: 7 Ways Congress is Trying to Destroy the Endangered Species Act | Earthjustice" on "Dasyurus viverrinus (Shaw, 1800)".

    My insights, as a retired Endangered Species Recovery Act biologist (USFWS,...

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Celeste South who took this action.

    Celeste South commented on "Dasyurus viverrinus (Shaw, 1800)":

    @Katja Schulz: Thanks Katja, I have an article under "Scoop It" written by EarthJustice, "7 Ways Congress is Trying to Destroy the ESA" with my insights as an Endangered Species Recovery Biologist. That will be my first contribution. I would greatly appreciate any feedback re my "insights". Thanks

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Katja Schulz who took this action.

    Katja Schulz commented on "Homonym Hunters":

    @F. Peregrinus: These are Barcode of Life BIN clusters. Not sure why NCBI has more than one taxon per BIN. Looks like a mapping problem that has been solved at the source. It should get fixed once we update NCBI.

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Katja Schulz who took this action.

    Katja Schulz commented on "Dasyurus viverrinus (Shaw, 1800)":

    @Celeste South: Hi Celeste, you can add text directly to EOL species pages (rather than to the comments feed). Simply go to the Detail tab, and look for the add an article button. Since you are a full curator, your contributions will automatically be classified as trusted content. Let me know if you need help with anything.

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Celeste South who took this action.

    Celeste South commented on "Dasyurus viverrinus (Shaw, 1800)":

    Endangered Species Week, Eastern Quoll "Eastern Quolls To Be Finally Reintroduced To Mainland Australia After 50 Years Of Extinction", The Guardian The eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus), also known as the eastern native cat, is a medium-sized carnivorous dasyurid marsupial native to Australia. They are now considered extinct on the mainland, but remain widespread and even locally common in Tasmania. It is one of six extant species of quolls. The eastern quoll was formerly found across much of southeastern mainland Australia, from the eastern coasts of South Australia, through most of Victoria, to the central coast of New South Wales. It died out on the continent around 1963, but remains widespread in Tasmania, and is also found today on Bruny Island, to which it is probably not native. Within Tasmania, eastern quolls inhabit rainforest, heathland, alpine areas, and scrub below 1,500 m (4,900 ft). However, they prefer dry grassland and forest mosaics, bounded by agricultural land, particularly where pasture grubs are common. Conservation The main threats to the eastern quoll are competition and predation from feral cats and illegal poisoning and trapping. The lack of foxes and dingoes in Tasmania is believed[by whom?] to have contributed to the survival of the species. The last mainland eastern quoll specimen was collected as roadkill in Sydney's Nielsen Park, Vaucluse on 31 January 1963. The National Parks and Wildlife service reported numerous unconfirmed sightings until 1999 (the year of the report), and the species was reported sighted as recently as 2006. Specimens collected in 2005 and 2008 west of Melbourne, Victoria, are likely connected with a nearby Conservation and Research Centre, either as direct escapees, or the descendants of escapees from that facility. Reintroduction to the Mainland Overseen by Parks Victoria, Australian National University, Rewilding Australia and Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council, this project will rehome 40 eastern quolls into this national park next year. “We want to get a top order predator back into the park, so we can restore the ecosystem. The quolls eat spiders, cockroaches, that sort of thing, and may also take out rabbits, which is a good thing in terms of pests,” said head of Rewilding Australia Rob Brewster to the Guardian. “We want them to breed and disperse. We’d hope that having them back will be a big community engagement tool. We can involve communities in better protection of vegetation because they’ll have this species in the vicinity." Rewilding Australia wants to take animal conservation to the next level by actively rehousing species into their natural habitat, such as the Tasmanian devil and the dingo. With the promotion of environmental education, Rewilding Australia hopes that nearby communities will learn about and take better care of their surrounding wildlife. However, it’s unlikely that the eastern quolls’ numbers will grow to their previously established figures without an imposed cull of their feral predators. Seeking to tackle this threat, the Australian Government are holding a threatened species summit in July to further discuss the reintroduction and sustainability of wildlife, such as the eastern quoll. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_quoll http://www.iflscience.com/…/eastern-quolls-be-finally-reint… Photo 1, 2 - Wiki Photo 3 - Deb Talan

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of F. Peregrinus who took this action.

    F. Peregrinus commented on "Homonym Hunters":

    Octopoda sp. BOLD:AAA1668 Octopoda;octopuses Are these homonyms, I hope so! I couldn't tell because "Octopoda sp. BOLD:AAA1668"didn't have an article!

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of C. Michael Hogan who took this action.

    C. Michael Hogan marked the classification from "Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life: April 2013" as preferred for "Eubalaena".

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Woojin Song who took this action.
    Woojin Song joined the community "EOL Curators".

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Nick Durmuller who took this action.

    Nick Durmuller added a link to "123pilze.de" on "Lycogala epidendrum (L.) Fr., 1829".

    Guidance for identification

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Nick Durmuller who took this action.

    Nick Durmuller added the German common name "Blutpilz" to "Lycogala epidendrum (L.) Fr., 1829".

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Nick Durmuller who took this action.

    Nick Durmuller added the German common name "Milchstäubling" to "Lycogala epidendrum (L.) Fr., 1829".

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Nick Durmuller who took this action.

    Nick Durmuller added the German common name "Blutmilchpilz" to "Lycogala epidendrum (L.) Fr., 1829".

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Nick Durmuller who took this action.

    Nick Durmuller added the French common name "Lait de loup" to "Lycogala epidendrum (L.) Fr., 1829".

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Valter Jacinto who took this action.

    Valter Jacinto added the Brazilian Portuguese common name "Poupa" to "Upupa epops Linnaeus 1758".

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of Valter Jacinto who took this action.

    Valter Jacinto marked the classification from "Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life: April 2013" as preferred for "Upupa epops Linnaeus 1758".

    about 1 month ago