My activity

  • Profile picture of John Bell who took this action.

    John Bell added a link to "Hydrothassa marginella (Linnaeus, 1758) " on "Hydrothassa marginella".

    Some sample photographs and brief UK distribution information

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of John Bell who took this action.

    John Bell added text to "Mistake in specific name?" on "Sciara militarsis Nowicki, 1868".

    This species is actually Sciara militaris, not Sciara militarsis.

    about 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of John Bell who took this action.

    John Bell commented on "Description":

    The haplotype found in Scotland (the larger black form mentioned above) was found to be different from the haplotype found in England/Wales (a smaller brown form). These two forms arose from two separate recolonisations after the end of glaciation - the Scottish haplotype from an Iberian refugium and the English from an Eastern European refugium. Ref: PIERTNEY, S. B., STEWART, W. A., LAMBIN, X., TELFER, S., AARS, J. and DALLAS, J. F. (2005), Phylogeographic structure and postglacial evolutionary history of water voles (Arvicola terrestris) in the United Kingdom. Molecular Ecology, 14: 1435–1444. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2005.02496.x

    about 3 years ago

  • Profile picture of John Bell who took this action.

    John Bell commented on "Arvicola terrestris (Linnaeus, 1758)":

    This species has been renamed Arvicola amphibius.

    about 3 years ago

  • Profile picture of John Bell who took this action.

    John Bell commented on "Range":

    The actual figure for habitat loss (from 1900) stated in the 1989-90 survey is 67.7%, and the figures for habitat loss (from the previous study) in the 1996-1998 study are 69.62% (baseline only) or 67.49% (baseline and historical). This would give total loss from 1900 until the 1996-1998 study of 90.2% or 89.6%.

    almost 5 years ago

  • Profile picture of John Bell who took this action.

    John Bell commented on "Range":

    The claim above that the 1996-98 survey showed a loss of 94% of sites is incorrect. This figure of 94% is from the earlier 1989-90 study by Jefferies and Strachan, and is an extrapolated figure - "Thus, we could eventually have a total loss of 94% of occupied sites this century and an even greater reduction in actual numbers." The actual loss reported in the study, since 1900, is 67.7%, although it may be as high as 77.2%. See Jefferies and Strachan, "The Water Vole Arvicola terrestris in Britain 1989-1990: Its distribution and changing Status", The Vincent Wildlife Trust, ISBN:0-946081-23-9

    almost 5 years ago