Dana Campbell

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  • Profile picture of Dana Campbell who took this action.

    Dana Campbell commented on an older version of The American Cheetah and the Pronghorn:

    Sorry, Theodore, but you're just not catching what I and this article are saying. It is very hard to interpret the biology of extinct organisms from their fossils. This article makes the point that scientists early on assumed that the American cheetah behaved like, moved like, preyed like, ran to speeds similar to the African cheetah because physical aspects appeared the same. More recently, the article says, scientists are questioning this. They are taking into account that these two animals lived on different continents, different environments. They aren't related spp. More evidence about their environments and their bone structure are known since the "Am cheetah is an African cheetah copycat" theory was put out. So when you say "Although it is true that American cheetahs are very similar to cheetahs in agility and speed" this is not supported by this article.

    In fact, the article takes great pains to discuss that in fact we don't know that the American cheetah was as agile as the cheetah (hence the author quotes Natalia Kennedy's work examining the American cheetah's spine to look at its flexibility and what this might mean for it's behaviors).

    To say that the "theory" that the Am. cheetah might have lived like the snow leopard (note, common names are not capitalized) might be true or might be "incorrect random speculation" is not only disrespectful to the researchers who proposed it, but also not informative to readers here at EOL. Where do you get the idea it is random speculation? It's an idea informed by study of the fossil specimens that were found in the area. Furthermore, (I repeat from my last comment to you) this idea is presented an *example* of one of the different possible ways that the American cheetah might have lived other than as a speed-demon predator of antelope, not evidence that this is the only way the Am. cheetah lived. You say "the theory's arguements -note spelling!- have been winning over more and more of the scientific community." This also just isn't supported, where did you get it? It is your editorializing. Hodnett and colleagues discuss observations that enlighten possible interpretations of the biology of this extinct animal, not just saying a different "just so story" (that it lived like a snow leopard) to counter the original theory (it lived like a cheetah).

    The end of your piece is also inappropriate. Where did you get this?: "However, many doubt that we will ever get a chance to know a lot about the American cheetah." Who are the many? Again this is your editorializing. This article actually says the opposite - citing all sorts of directions that might give us more info about this animal.

    3 months ago

  • Profile picture of Dana Campbell who took this action.

    Dana Campbell commented on an older version of The American Cheetah and the Pronghorn:

    This comment was deleted.

    3 months ago • deleted: 3 months ago

  • Profile picture of Dana Campbell who took this action.

    Dana Campbell commented on "Numbers":

    Plus, this category "unclassified Hymenoptera" is something NCBI has made - you would need to go look up what these spp in order to discuss this. Better to stick with more standard taxonomic categories here.

    3 months ago

  • Profile picture of Dana Campbell who took this action.

    Dana Campbell commented on "Numbers":

    Theodore, thanks for making changes here, but this is just not what we need. There is too much editorializing. How do you know most people think all species of Hymenoptera are known? Your interpretation of unclassified is not a scientific one. Plus these numbers just don't look correct - where did you get them? What is this reference?

    3 months ago

  • Profile picture of Dana Campbell who took this action.

    Dana Campbell commented on an older version of The American Cheetah and the Pronghorn:

    The article does not say that American cheetah's lived more like modern snow leopards - it says that *some* of them may have had similar hunting strategy as snow leopards - it's an example of how these animals may not simply run down prey for a living. The article does clearly say we don't know much about how this animal lived. It doesn't say how fast it ran. it doesn't say that this "theory is refuted," either. Just that we don't know. Please read/interpret carefully.

    3 months ago

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    Dana Campbell commented on "Classification":

    I agree with Katja, this is unclear. Near classification? what are all these unknowns?

    3 months ago

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    Dana Campbell commented on "Classification":

    This comment was deleted.

    3 months ago • deleted: 3 months ago

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    Dana Campbell commented on "File:Britannica Dodo 2.jpg":

    but species name is incorrect in the figure description, should be P. solitaria, not P. solitarius.

    3 months ago

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    Dana Campbell commented on "n338_w1150":

    Walter Rothschild commissioned British artist Frederick William Frohawk to restore the Réunion solitaire as both a white dodo, based on the Withoos painting, and as a distinct bird based on Dubois' description, for his 1907 book Extinct Birds. (according to Wikipedia, retrieved Sept. 18 2014 from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=R%C3%A9union_ibis&oldid=625940291

    3 months ago

  • Profile picture of Dana Campbell who took this action.

    Dana Campbell commented on "n338_w1150":

    Walter Rothschild commissioned British artist Frederick William Frohawk to restore the Réunion solitaire as both a white dodo, based on the Withoos painting, and as a distinct bird based on Dubois' description, for his 1907 book Extinct Birds. (according to Wikipedia, retrieved Sept. 18 2014 from http://en.wikipedia.org

    3 months ago

  • Profile picture of Dana Campbell who took this action.

    Dana Campbell commented on "n338_w1150":

    incorrect association

    3 months ago

  • Profile picture of Dana Campbell who took this action.

    Dana Campbell commented on "n336_w1150":

    incorrect association

    3 months ago

  • Profile picture of Dana Campbell who took this action.

    Dana Campbell commented on "File:DodoTree-Naturalis-PeterMaas2009.jpg":

    wrong dodo

    3 months ago

  • Profile picture of Dana Campbell who took this action.

    Dana Campbell commented on "File:DodoTree-Naturalis-PeterMaas2009.jpg":

    wrong dodo

    3 months ago

  • Profile picture of Dana Campbell who took this action.

    Dana Campbell commented on "File:White dodo.jpg":

    White dodo=Threskiornis solitarius (Ibis)

    3 months ago

  • Profile picture of Dana Campbell who took this action.

    Dana Campbell commented on "File:Reunion dodo.jpg":

    Not correct name

    3 months ago

  • Profile picture of Dana Campbell who took this action.

    Dana Campbell commented on "Brief Summary":

    Details here are not correct.

    3 months ago

  • Profile picture of Dana Campbell who took this action.

    Dana Campbell commented on an older version of Risks:

    not appropriate for genus level

    3 months ago

  • Profile picture of Dana Campbell who took this action.

    Dana Campbell commented on an older version of Risks:

    not appropriate for genus level

    3 months ago

  • Profile picture of Dana Campbell who took this action.

    Dana Campbell commented on an older version of Broad-striped Malagasy mongoose or vontsira fotsy (Galidictis fasciata):

    This is my third and last comment for now, Jonathan, sorry they are in reverse order from the way I wrote them...

    You were very thorough about citing sources to back up the info in your write-up. Thank you for this! One more thing - please be careful about how you write out your sources. They should be consistent in format and info. E.g.:

    Blench, Roger and Martin Walsh: Faunal names in Malagasy: their etymologies and implications for the prehistory of the East African coast (2009)

    should be

    Blench, R. and M. Walsh (2009). Faunal names in Malagasy: their etymologies and implications for the prehistory of the East African coast. And you should have more info here. What is this? A book? An article? A webpage? If there is an electronic link to it, please provide it.

    Hawkins, A.F.A. (2008) should have the web address/link. Since the access date listed here is way before you wrote this article, I'm thinking that you might not have directly used this reference (it was a reference inside a reference?) in which case you can leave it out here -- your reader can track back to the references within the source you used yourself.

    Animal Diversity Web (http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Galidictis_fasciata/). At the bottom of the page for this source, ADW gives information about how to cite the article (many websites do this - it's very convenient and worth looking for!) Please use their format: Burrell, M. 2005. "Galidictis fasciata" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed September 09, 2014 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Galidictis_fasciata/

    your references numbers 8,9 and 13 (all websites like the ADW one above) also need more detailed citations. Please look back on the website. They should have author and date if at all possible. Reference 13 is wikipedia article - it needs the reference to permanent link you used. See here for how to cite a wikipedia article on EOL: http://eol.org/info/reusing_wikipedia (scroll down a little - the first part on this link doesn't apply to you here)

    3 months ago