Nathan Wilson

EOL Director of Biodiversity Informatics

My activity

  • Profile picture of Nathan Wilson who took this action.

    Nathan Wilson commented on "data about Niebla":

    These seems to be the result of inaccurate text mining.

    3 months ago

  • Profile picture of Nathan Wilson who took this action.

    Nathan Wilson commented on "EOL Curators":

    The problem has been fixed. It was a year rollover problem. Thanks for the report!

    4 months ago

  • Profile picture of Nathan Wilson who took this action.

    Nathan Wilson commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Yan Wong: I'm seeing the problem with cropped image as well. Not sure what's going on yet, but we'll look into today.

    4 months ago

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    Nathan Wilson commented on "Reproduction":

    This article contradicts it self "Breeding season begins in mid-August" vs. "Breeding season begin in mid-April".

    5 months ago

  • Profile picture of Nathan Wilson who took this action.

    Nathan Wilson commented on an older version of Discover Life: Point Map of Chroogomphus flavipes:

    Chroogomphus flavipes is not a correct name. It should be Gomphidius flavipes, but it isn't clear if the data behind this observation is actually G. flavipes or some actual Chroogomphus.

    5 months ago

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    Nathan Wilson commented on "Image of Chroogomphus ochraceus":

    The name Chroogomphus flavipes is based on an incorrect transfer of Gomphidius flavipes to the genus Chroogomphus. The original description of the species clearly describes a Gomphidius species that has a white stipe with a yellow base and pallid flesh. This image is clearly a Chroogomphus and based on the color and location it is most likely Chroogomphus ochraceus.

    5 months ago

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    Nathan Wilson commented on "Image of an unknown taxon":

    Since this image came from CalPhotos, I assume it was taken in the US. Chroogomhus rutilus has only been verified to come from Europe based on sequence data. C. ochraceus and C. vinicolor have been verified from the US, but there is no reliable macroscopic way to distinguish dark color specimens such as these.

    6 months ago

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    Nathan Wilson commented on "Image of an unknown taxon":

    Chroogomhus rutilus has only been verified to come from Europe based on sequence data. C. ochraceus and C. vinicolor have been verified from the US, but there is no reliable macroscopic way to distinguish dark color specimens such as these.

    6 months ago

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    Nathan Wilson commented on "Amanita muscaria (L.) Lam. 1783":

    @Dana Campbell: Hi Dana, I'm curious why you chose CoL over Index Fungorum for this taxon. Our current import of IF is a bit problematic because it lists subspecific taxa at the species level, but I'm concerned about CoL since it doesn't list at least two very common subspecific taxa in North America (guessowii and flavivolvata). Personally I would pick Index Fungorum for this taxon, but I want to make sure that seems reasonable to you.

    6 months ago

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    Nathan Wilson commented on "Taxon Clean-Up Tasks Completed":

    @Katja Schulz: Interesting. I just saw the same Radicula/Rorippa problem and submitted a possible fix. I found 4 classifications in Rorippa that had Radicula. Perhaps you just did the split.

    7 months ago

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    Nathan Wilson commented on "EOL API Discussion Group":

    To be clear, there are expected to be a lot of redirects and there are some missing pages (mostly in the lower numbers). Currently the highest number I could find is 36680949. This means that only 1 in 27 ID numbers are not redirects or missing pages. My understanding is that this is because the data harvesting process creates a page whenever it sees a name that is in anyway different from anything it has seen in the past. There is then a process that figures out whether new names are most likely the same as some existing page. If it is then, it is turned into a redirect. However, the original number is maintained since there may have been an error in that process. In general it is not a great idea to deal directly with the ID numbers. However, there are circumstances where you pretty much have to. It would be helpful to know why you need the largest page number. For example, I needed it at one point since I wanted to create a list of truly random pages so I could test somethings about EOL. It would have served my purpose better if there was an API call to ask for a random set of pages.

    10 months ago

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    Nathan Wilson commented on "Cape Cod Native Garden Plants":

    @Bob Corrigan: Added you as a manager. Knock yourself out. I'm focused on a talk I'm giving tonight for which improvements to this list would be a benefit. The list I've started with is http://www.capecodcommission.org/resources/design/nativeplantlist.pdf

    11 months ago • edited: 11 months ago

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    Nathan Wilson commented on "Cape Cod Native Garden Plants":

    This comment was deleted.

    11 months ago • deleted: 11 months ago

  • Profile picture of Nathan Wilson who took this action.

    Nathan Wilson commented on "EOL API Discussion Group":

    How is the image getting into EOL or how are are you finding the image in question?

    11 months ago

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    Nathan Wilson commented on "EOL API Discussion Group":

    The only approach I've found for doing this with the current API is to use the collection API to get a list of the photos provided by a content partner. It's a bit ugly, but there's enough information there to figure out the needed calls to the data_object API call.
    I'm interested in your use case. The most important case we've come up with is providing content partners a way to get deep links into EOL. This suggest a large batch lookup for all the content for a partner would be more efficient than a picture by picture lookup using, for example, the unique id provided by a given content partner.
    In our existing ticket tracking system, I've already requested:
    - A single (possibly paginated) API call that returns all the information a content partner needs to connect their pages to the appropriate EOL pages. In this case having the returned by the data_object API call added to the collection API call would be sufficient, but having the unique id provided by the content partner would be better (parsing URLs is ugly).
    - Include in the collection API the data_object URL rather than just the EOL data_object id (gives EOL the ability to change the URL).
    - An API call for discovering a content partner's collection (currently you have to look it up by hand and hard code it).

    11 months ago • edited: 11 months ago

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    Nathan Wilson commented on "Stipe surface - enlarged":

    @Malcolm Storey: I did look at the full set of bioimages and based on that info I don't know for sure that it is or isn't Xerocomus (=Boletus) subtomentosus. That's why I marked it as "incorrect/misleading" not "misidentified". I recognized that Retiboletus ornatipes has not been recorded in the UK and I'm not suggesting that would be a better id. Given the state of the Boletaceae in general right now, I prefer to take a very conservative approach to applying names. I would be very interested to see where a sequence from this specimen lands in a phylogenetic tree.

    11 months ago

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    Nathan Wilson commented on "Fruitbody - in situ - top view":

    This does not seem typical of Xerocomus (=Boletus) subtomentosus. The pileus color in this shot is atypical. Looks more like Retiboletus ornatipes.

    11 months ago

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    Nathan Wilson commented on "Cap surface - enlarged":

    This does not seem typical of Xerocomus (=Boletus) subtomentosus. The pileus color in this shot is atypical. Looks more like Retiboletus ornatipes.

    11 months ago • edited: 11 months ago

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    Nathan Wilson commented on "Pores":

    This does not seem typical of Xerocomus (=Boletus) subtomentosus. The pores in this shot are atypical.

    11 months ago

  • Profile picture of Nathan Wilson who took this action.

    Nathan Wilson commented on "Fruitbody - LS":

    This does not seem typical of Xerocomus (=Boletus) subtomentosus. The pores in this shot are atypical.

    11 months ago