Overview

Distribution

Range Description

C. maurus has been found in almost all coastal rivers, from the Senegal to the Pra (Ghana). It also occurs in estuaries and lagoons.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Africa: Senegal and Pra (Ghana). Reported from rivers of Côte d'Ivoire (Ref. 272), Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Sierra Leone and Liberia (Ref. 13331).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Western Africa.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© FishWise Professional

Source: FishWise Professional

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 2; Dorsal soft rays (total): 57; Analspines: 0
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Size

Maximum size: 510 mm SL
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© FishWise Professional

Source: FishWise Professional

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Max. size

51.0 cm SL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 3236))
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Diagnosis: second or third branched dorsal-fin ray longest (except in juveniles in which the first is the longest), but never filamentous; adipose fin small, its base shorter than or equal to dorsal-fin base; high number of branched pectoral-fin rays (usually 9, rarely 8); 12-16 (most often 13 or 14) stout and crenulate gill rakers on lower limb of first gill arch; there are important differences among the various populations of this species, and sexual dimorphism is noticeable between mature specimens in reproductive activity and immature individuals, more pronounced in males than in females and increasing with growth (Ref. 57126).Description: nasal barbels present; very short first dorsal spine; well developed second spine, weakly denticulate along posterior margin; pelvic fin with 1 unbranched and 5 branched soft rays; anal fin with 3-4 unbranched and 6-10 branched soft rays (Ref. 57126). There are important differences among the various populations of this species. One of the most variable characters is the length of dorsal and caudal fins: specimens from rivers usually have a longer dorsal fin than those from lakes and lagoons; adult specimens from the rivers Casamance, Lofa, Moa, St. Paul, St. John, Cess, Cavally, Sassandra and especially Bandama, have a dorsal fin reaching or exceeding (when pressed to body) the adipose fin. The number of gill rakers on the lower limb of first gill arch varies between 12 and 16, but most specimens have 13 or 14; the populations from the rivers Kakrima, Taja, Moa and Waanje have 14 or 15 lower gill rakers and are furthermore characterized by having a long snout (over 40% of head length), this proportion fluctuating between 30 and 40% in most of the other specimens (Ref. 57126). Sexual dimorphism is noticeable between mature specimens in reproductive activity and immature individuals, more pronounced in males than in females and increasing with growth. The width of the premaxillary tooth plate is less than 1/5 of head length in immature adults, but increases up to 1/3 of head length in mature individuals; the mouth width, which in immature specimens is smaller than, or equal to, snout length, increases up to 1.5 times the snout length; the palatine dentition, normally reduced to a few teeth or small bands, increases in adult males forming two long, straight bands; finally, the dorsal fin and spine become proportionally smaller, all fins more rounded, and the head, inflated (Ref. 57126).Coloration: live specimens silvery, with brownish or greenish reflections (Ref. 57126). Preserved individuals: dark brown on head and back, whitish on belly; dorsal and caudal fins frequently finely black-edged; often a black spot behind gill cover; some specimens entirely black (Ref. 57126).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This is a demersal fish of 51.0 cm SL

Systems
  • Freshwater
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Environment

demersal; potamodromous (Ref. 51243); freshwater
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Migration

Potamodromous. Migrating within streams, migratory in rivers, e.g. Saliminus, Moxostoma, Labeo. Migrations should be cyclical and predictable and cover more than 100 km.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Laly, P.

Reviewer/s
Entsua-Mensah, M., Darwall, W. & Smith, K.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has a wide distribution with no known major widespread threats.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
No available data.

Population Trend
Unknown
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
None known.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Least Concern (LC)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
None known.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries:
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!