Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Found in water courses at high altitude (Ref. 26100). Inhabits cold streams and small rivers, usually in deep, quiet places. Occurs in groups. Feeds on invertebrates. Spawns in April-May. Attains a maximum size of about 70 cm SL (Ref. 59043). Threatened by the construction of dams, introduction of new species and overfishing (Ref. 26100).
  • Kottelat, M. and J. Freyhof 2007 Handbook of European freshwater fishes. Publications Kottelat, Cornol, Switzerland. 646 p. (Ref. 59043)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Range Description

It is restricted to a few Adriatic rivers in Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Montenegro: Krka (very rare), Jadro, Neretva, and Zeta river basins. It is introduced into the Zrnovnica.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Europe: Adriatic basin in Krka, Jardo, Vrljika (Croatia), Neretva (Bosnia-Herzegovina) and Zeta drainages (Montenegro). Introduced and established from Jardo to Zrnovnica drainages (Croatia) around 1960.
  • Kottelat, M. and J. Freyhof 2007 Handbook of European freshwater fishes. Publications Kottelat, Cornol, Switzerland. 646 p. (Ref. 59043)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Size

Max. size

70.0 cm SL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 59043))
  • Kottelat, M. and J. Freyhof 2007 Handbook of European freshwater fishes. Publications Kottelat, Cornol, Switzerland. 646 p. (Ref. 59043)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Distinguished from all its congeners in Adriatic basin by having the following unique characters: lips fleshy; lateral line scales elliptical, reduced to little more than nerve tube, smaller than scales in adjacent rows; 100-120 scales along lateral line; 26-32 gill rakers. Differs further by the combination of the following features: jaw teeth small or indistinct; snout blunt; and mouth subinferior (Ref. 59043).
  • Kottelat, M. and J. Freyhof 2007 Handbook of European freshwater fishes. Publications Kottelat, Cornol, Switzerland. 646 p. (Ref. 59043)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It lives in rivers of the karstic region.

Systems
  • Freshwater
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Environment

benthopelagic; non-migratory; freshwater
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EN
Endangered

Red List Criteria
B2ab(v)

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2006

Assessor/s
Crivelli, A.J.

Reviewer/s
Freyhof, J. & Darwall, W. (Mediterranean Workshop, Dec. 2004)

Contributor/s

Justification
S. obtusirostris occurs at only four locations. In all of those locations, it is being threatened by overfishing (sportfishing and for food) and hybridisation with introduced trout. The total area of occupancy (AOO) is less than 500 km², and there is a continuing decline in mature individuals due to overfishing and poaching, especially at Zeta, Imotski and Krka. (Freyhof, J. pers comm).

History
  • 1996
    Endangered
  • 1996
    Data Deficient
  • 1994
    Endangered
    (Groombridge 1994)
  • 1990
    Endangered
    (IUCN 1990)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
Decreasing.

Population Trend
Decreasing
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
The main threats are overfishing (sportfishing, food, including poaching) and hybridizitation with foreign trout. Habitat destruction (dams), water pollution.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Endangered (EN) (B2ab(v))
  • IUCN 2006 2006 IUCN red list of threatened species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded July 2006.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: commercial; gamefish: yes
  • Robins, C.R., R.M. Bailey, C.E. Bond, J.R. Brooker, E.A. Lachner, R.N. Lea and W.B. Scott 1991 World fishes important to North Americans. Exclusive of species from the continental waters of the United States and Canada. Am. Fish. Soc. Spec. Publ. (21):243 p. (Ref. 4537)
  • Crivelli, A.J. 1996 The freshwater fish endemic to the Mediterranean region. An action plan for their conservation. Tour du Valat Publication, 171 p. (Ref. 26100)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Salmo obtusirostris

Salmo obtusirostris, also known as the Adriatic trout,[2] Adriatic salmon,[1] and softmouth trout,[3] is a species of salmonid fish endemic to the rivers of Western Balkans in southeastern Europe. The scientific name has changed several times through history; synonyms include Thymallus microlepis, Salmothymus obtusirostris and Salar obtusirostris.[2]

This species spawns in the early spring and is an obligatory freshwater fish.[3] They are an important game fish.[2]

Distribution and subspecies[edit]

Salmo obtusirostris is found naturally in five drainages of the Adriatic Sea, in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Montenegro: the Neretva, Vrljika, Jadro, Zeta and Krka river drainages.[2][3] In addition it has been introduced from the Jadro to the Zrnovnica drainage in about 1960.[2] The different populations are sometimes classified into subspecies:[3]

Appearance and anatomy[edit]

The most obvious characteristic of the Adriatic trout is an elongated snout. It also has a small and flashy mouth, relatively large scales and high body depth.[3] Color of the body varies between subspecies, mostly it is green with red and black dots. No vertical stripes that are common in brown trout of the Adriatic Sea drainages can be found.[citation needed]

Conservation[edit]

Adriatic trout are threatened by hybridization with introduced species and overfishing.[1] In the river Neretva, natural hybrids (named kosor by locals) between Adriatic and brown trout can be found. Hybridization was also confirmed experimentally (Kosorić & Vuković. 1969).[full citation needed] Adriatic trout prefers rivers with more water and wide riverbed. Adriatic and brown trout have different spawning times that overlap only slightly every few years, which is why natural hybridization is not widespread and both species live sympatrically in the same rivers.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Crivelli, A.J. (2006). "Salmo obtusirostris". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2006. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 25 September 2009. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2007). "Salmo obtusirostris" in FishBase. May 2007 version.
  3. ^ a b c d e "Softmouth trout". Balkan Trout Restoration Group. Retrieved 19 February 2011. 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 1 person

Average rating: 4.0 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!