Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Erect perennial herbs. Roots wiry or fusiform. Leaves subterete or flattened, glabrous or ciliate on the margins, ± fleshy. Inflorescence a [?simple], many-flowered raceme. Bracts membranous, persistent. Pedicels not articulated. Flowers bright yellow. Perianth segments free, all 1-nerved. Filaments densely long-hairy. Ovary sessile. Capsule subspherical to oblong-ovoid. Seeds (in ours) pyramidal, sharply 3-angled, sometimes winged.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 14
Specimens with Sequences: 15
Specimens with Barcodes: 15
Species: 6
Species With Barcodes: 6
Public Records: 8
Public Species: 4
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Bulbine

Bulbine is a genus of plants in the family Xanthorrhoeaceae, subfamily Asphodeloideae,[2] named for the bulb-shaped tuber shown by many of the species.[3] (Formerly it was has been placed in the Liliaceae.[4]) Bulbine is found chiefly in Southern Africa, with few species extending into tropical Africa and a few species in Australia.[5]

Bulbine is characterised by having flowers borne in lax or compound racemes, and by being succulent.[5] The flowers are mostly yellow, with bearded stamens, although sometimes white, orange or pink.[5] Several species are grown in gardens, although the most common species in the horticultural trade is B. frutescens.[5] Species of Bulbine resemble Haworthia and Aloe in appearance, but with soft fleshy leaves, many with tuberous roots or a caudex. The various species grow as shrubs, rough tough weedy perennials, dwarf geophytes, and soft annuals. Many of the dwarf species have small, dome-shaped tubers.

Dormancy starts in late spring and lasts until mid autumn, but can vary between species and in different conditions. Leaves die and drop and the roots contract into the caudex leaving no visible sign of life on the surface. Propagation is mostly by seed although cuttings are possible as some species will form multiple heads or offsets.

Species

Bulbine contains approximately 160 species.[1]

References

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Source: Wikipedia

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