Overview

Distribution

endemic to a single nation

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Amanda's Pennant

The Amanda's Pennant (Celithemis amanda) is a dragonfly found in North America, in the Pennant genus of dragonflies.

Identification[edit]

Recognizable by the small size and colorful red, amber or brown markings on the basal section of the hind wings. The spot extends about 1/4 the length of each wing, normally with two anterior stripes and one posterior black stripe. The thorax is yellow but otherwise unmarked until older when it begins to brown. The veins in the forewings are unmarked. The face is yellow to brown or red in older males.[1]

  • Similar Species: Ornate Pennant (C. ornata) also has a basal spot in the hindwing with 2 or 3 dark stripes running through it. Other smaller pennants have spots that are larger in the hindwing.
  • Total length: 24–31 mm; abdomen: 16–22 mm; hindwing: 21–27 mm.
  • Flight Season: January (Texas) – September (Louisiana)

Habitat[edit]

Southeastern U.S., generally along coast from eastern Texas to South Carolina.[2] In calm lakes, ponds, and marshes with emergent vegetation.

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