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Overview

Distribution

Range Description

The geographic distribution of Lepus mandshuricus includes eastern China, the Ussuri region of Russia (Hoffmann and Smith 2005), and may extend into North Korea (Smith and Xie 2008). It is possibly parapatric with L. coreanus in North Korea (Hoffmann and Smith 2005). It inhabits elevations between 300-900 m (Flux and Angermann 1990).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Lepus mandshuricus is a forest dwelling hare that prefers mixed forest to homogeneous conifer (Flux and Angermann 1990). This species avoids open habitat and human settlements (Flux and Angermann 1990). It is presumed that the ecology of L. mandshuricus is equivalent to that of L. americanus, its New World ecological equivalent (Angermann 1966). Litter size is usually one to two but periodically can be as high as four to five (Flux and Angermann 1990). The total length of L. mandshuricus is 41.0-54.0 cm (Smith and Xie 2008).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Smith, A.T. & Johnston, C.H.

Reviewer/s
Boyer, A.F. & Johnston, C.H. (Lagomorph Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
This is a widespread species that occurs in protected areas; however, efforts should be made to ascertain the population status.
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Population

Population
There are currently no data regarding population for this species.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
Forest clearing results in loss of habitat for Lepus mandshuricus that promotes replacement by L. tolai (Flux and Angermann 1990).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species occurs in Honghe, Liangshui, Xingkaihu, Laotudingzi, Baishilazi, and Sanjiang Nature Reserves (CSIS 2008). Research should be undertaken to address the lack of data regarding population for Lepus mandshuricus. Research is also needed to determine the status of habitat for this species (Flux and Angermann 1990). This species was regionally Red Listed as Least Concern in China (Wang and Xie 2004).
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Wikipedia

Manchurian hare

The Manchurian hare (Lepus mandshuricus) is a species of hare found in northeastern China, the Amur River basin, and in the higher mountains of northern Korea. The adult Manchurian hare weighs about 2 kilograms, and has a body length of 40–48 centimeters (16–19 in), in addition to a tail of 4.5–7.5 centimeters (1.8–3.0 in). The ears are typically 7.5–10.4 centimeters in length. Compared to the Korean hare, its hind legs are relatively short and its ears relatively small. A melanistic morph exists, and has been described as the separate species Lepus melainus.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hoffman, R. S.; Smith, A. T. (2005). "Order Lagomorpha". In Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M. Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 200–201. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494. 
  2. ^ Smith, A.T. & Johnston, C.H. (2008). "Lepus mandshuricus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.1. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  3. ^ a b Liu, Jiang; Chen, Peng; Yu, Li; Wu, Shi-Fang; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Jiang, Xuelong (31 August 2011). "The taxonomic status of Lepus melainus (Lagomorpha: Leporidae) based on nuclear DNA and morphological analyses". Zootaxa (3010): 47–57. 
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