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Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Aeshna grandis is found in northeastern and central Europe, and east to Lake Baikal in Russia.
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Source: IUCN

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species breeds in a wide range of calm waters, usually with rich bank-side or submerged vegetation, such as abandoned canals, oxbows and fenlands. Adults are often seen in forested areas.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Animal / parasite / ectoparasite / blood sucker
adult of Forcipomyia paludis sucks the blood of live wing base (under side) of adult of Aeshna grandis

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Aeshna grandis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2009

Assessor/s
Clausnitzer, V.

Reviewer/s
Kalkman, V. & Suhling. F. (Odonata Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
Aeshna grandis is widespread and common in its range. Studies are in place to research and monitor the species population range and trends although more work is needed in this area and on habitat restoration.
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Population

Population
This species is widespread and common throughout its range although no information on population size or trend.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
The destruction of habitat through agricultural practices and pollution, are a threat to Aeshna grandis.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Aeshna grandis populations are being researched and monitored although further studies are needed.
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Wikipedia

Brown hawker

The brown hawker (Aeshna grandis) is a large dragonfly about 73 millimetres (2.9 in) long. It is a distinctive species and is easily recognised, even in flight, by its brown body and bronze wings. At rest, blue spots on the second and third segments of the male's abdomen can be noticed; these are absent in female.

It is widespread in England but commonest in the South East; local in Ireland and rare in Scotland. It is found on well-vegetated ponds, lakes and canals. It patrols a regular hunting territory around margins which is vigorously defended against intruders.

The flight time is mainly July to September. The nymph has stripes on the side of the thorax and distinct banding on the legs.

References[edit]

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