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Overview

Brief Summary

WhyReef - Lifestyle

The calcium carbonate in its cells gives its body some support, but also makes it harder for some animals to eat.

Calcareous green seaweed can be found in all parts of the reef, and provides home and shelter for many small invertebrates and fish.

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Comprehensive Description

WhyReef - Fun Facts

Calcareous green seaweed is an important reef-builder: when it dies, the calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in its body becomes building material for the reef! Calcium carbonate is also known as limestone, which is a mineral that is made by animals.
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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 138 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 64 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 1 - 62
  Temperature range (°C): 15.316 - 26.401
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.211 - 1.423
  Salinity (PPS): 37.020 - 38.444
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.691 - 5.541
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.095 - 0.180
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.247 - 2.580

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 1 - 62

Temperature range (°C): 15.316 - 26.401

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.211 - 1.423

Salinity (PPS): 37.020 - 38.444

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.691 - 5.541

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.095 - 0.180

Silicate (umol/l): 1.247 - 2.580
 
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Associations

WhyReef - Menu

Since it makes its own food, calcareous green seaweed doesn’t have to eat. It makes its own food through a process called photosynthesis. During photosynthesis it takes carbon dioxide (CO2) and energy from the sun and converts these into sugar and oxygen (O2). Photosynthesis takes place in organ-like parts in its cells called chloroplasts. Because it makes its own food, it is a producer.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Halimeda tuna

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Halimeda tuna

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Threats

WhyReef - Threats

Calcareous green seaweed is not threatened yet, but the ocean is starting to become more acidic, which makes it more difficult for the seaweed to make calcium carbonate and grow!
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Wikipedia

Halimeda tuna

Halimeda tuna is a species of green macroalgae.

Halimeda tuna is the type species of the genus Halimeda.

References


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