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Overview

Distribution

Range Description

The species' range extends from southern British Columbia, Idaho, Utah, Colorado, and Kansas southward through the southwestern United States to southern Baja California (including Isla Partida Norte, in the Gulf of California) and Guerrero in mainland Mexico, at elevations from near sea level to around 2,650 m asl (8,700 feet) (Stebbins 2003). Reports of occurrences as far south as Costa Rica (e.g., Ernst and Ernst 2003) are incorrect (Savage 2002).
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Continent: Middle-America North-America
Distribution: Mexico (Sinaloa, Nayarit, Jalisco, Colima, Michoacan, Guerrero, W Puebla, Morelos)  tortugensis: Isla Tortuga
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Physical Description

Type Information

Holotype for Hypsiglena torquata
Catalog Number: USNM 1782
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles
Preparation: Ethanol
Locality: Laredo and Camargo, between, County Undetermined, Texas, United States, North America
  • Holotype: Stejneger, L. 1893. North American Fauna. 7: 205.
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Paratype for Hypsiglena torquata
Catalog Number: USNM 59371
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles
Sex/Stage: Female;
Preparation: Ethanol
Year Collected: 1916
Locality: Isla Cedros, northeast side of, Isla Cedros, Baja California Norte, Mexico
  • Paratype: Zweifel, R. G. 1958. American Museum Novitates. (1895): 12, figure 1, A and B.
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Ecology

Habitat

Palouse Grasslands Habitat

This taxon is found in the Palouse grasslands, among other North American ecoregions. The Palouse ecoregion extends over eastern Washington, northwestern Idaho and northeastern Oregon. Grasslands and savannas once covered extensive areas of the inter-mountain west, from southwest Canada into western Montana in the USA. Today, areas like the great Palouse prairie of eastern  are virtually eliminated as natural areas due to conversion to rangeland. The Palouse, formerly a vast expanse of native wheatgrasses (Agropyron spp), Idaho Fescue (Festuca idahoensis), and other grasses, has been mostly plowed and converted to wheat fields or is covered by Drooping Brome (Bromus tectorum) and other alien plant species.

the Palouse historically resembled the mixed-grass vegetation of the Central grasslands, except for the absence of short grasses. Such species as Bluebunch Wheatgrass (Elymus spicatus), Idaho Fescue (Festuca idahoensis) and Giant Wildrye (Elymus condensatus) and the associated species Lassen County Bluegrass (Poa limosa), Crested Hairgrass (Koeleria pyramidata), Bottlebrush Squirrel-tail (Sitanion hystrix), Needle-and-thread (Stipa comata) and Western Wheatgrass (Agropyron smithii) historically dominated the Palouse prairie grassland.

Representative mammals found in the Palouse grasslands include the Yellow-bellied Marmot (Marmota flaviventris), found burrowing in grasslands or beneath rocky scree; American Black Bear (Ursus americanus); American Pika (Ochotona princeps); Coast Mole (Scapanus orarius), who consumes chiefly earthworms and insects; Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel (Spermophilus lateralis); Gray Wolf (Canis lupus); Great Basin Pocket Mouse (Perognathus parvus); Northern River Otter (Lontra canadensis); the Near Threatened Washington Ground Squirrel (Spermophilus washingtoni), a taxon who prefers habitat with dense grass cover and deep soils; and the Northern Flying Squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus), a mammal that can be either arboreal or fossorial.

There are not a large number of amphibians in this ecoregion. The species present are the Great Basin Spadefoot Toad (Spea intermontana), a fossorial toad that sometimes filches the burrows of small mammals; Long-toed Salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum); Northern Leopard Frog (Glaucomys sabrinus), typically found near permanent water bodies or marsh; Columbia Spotted Frog (Rana luteiventris), usually found near permanent lotic water; Pacific Treefrog (Pseudacris regilla), who deposits eggs on submerged plant stems or the bottom of water bodies; Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum), fossorial species found in burrows or under rocks; Woodhouse's Toad (Anaxyrus woodhousii), found in arid grasslands with deep friable soils; Western Toad (Anaxyrus boreas), who uses woody debris or submerged vegetation to protect its egg-masses.

There are a limited number of reptiles found in the Palouse grasslands, namely only: the Northern Alligator Lizard (Elgaria coerulea), often found in screes, rock outcrops as well as riparian vicinity; the Painted Turtle (Chrysemys picta), who prefers lentic freshwater habitat with a thick mud layer; Yellow-bellied Racer (Chrysemys picta); Ringneck Snake (Diadophis punctatus), often found under loose stones in this ecoregion; Pygmy Short-horned Lizard (Phrynosoma douglasii), a fossorial taxon often found in bunchgrass habitats; Side-blotched Lizard (Uta stansburiana), frequently found in sandy washes with scattered rocks; Southern Alligator Lizard (Elgaria multicarinata), an essentially terrestrial species that prefers riparian areas and other moist habitats; Pacific Pond Turtle (Emys marmorata), a species that usually overwinters in upland habitat; Western Rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis), who, when inactive, may hide under rocks or in animal burrows; Night Snake (Hypsiglena torquata); Western Skink (Plestiodon skiltonianus), who prefers grasslands with rocky areas; Western Terrestrial Garter Snake (Thamnophis elegans), found in rocky grasslands, especially near water; Rubber Boa (Charina bottae).

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Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This snake generally inhabits arid and semi-arid plains, flats, canyons, and hillsides, usually rocky, dissected or hilly terrain with sandy or gravelly soils, including desert (e.g., creosote bush, sagebrush), prairie, foothill grassland, chaparral, thornscrub, thornforest, pinyon-juniper woodland, scrubby oak-juniper savanna, mesquite savanna, pine-hardwood woodland, and sometimes moist mountain meadows (Degenhardt et al. 1996, Hammerson 1999, Werler and Dixon 2000, Stebbins 2003). Periods of inactivity are spent under rocks or other surface cover, in crevices, or underground. In Idaho, individuals can be found under surface rocks in spring, but not in summer. It feeds on small amphibians and reptiles, and is an oviviparous species.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Life History and Behavior

Life Expectancy

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

Maximum longevity: 12.2 years (captivity)
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Hypsiglena torquata

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 2 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.  Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

ACTCGTTGACTTTTCTCAACAAACCACAAAGATATTGGAACCCTATACCTCTTATTTGGGGCCTGATCCGGCCTAATCGGAGCCTGCCTA---AGCATTCTTATACGAATAGAACTAACTCAGCCCGGCTCCTTATTCGGAAGC---GATCAAATTTTTAACGTTTTAGTTACAGCCCACGCATTCATCATAATTTTCTTCATAGTCATACCAATTATAATCGGAGGGTTCGGCAATTGACTAATCCCACTAATA---ATTGGAGCCCCGGATATAGCCTTTCCACGAATAAATAATATAAGCTTCTGACTACTACCCCCAGCACTACTACTTCTGCTATCATCTTCATACGTGGAAGCAGGGGCTGGCACAGGTTGAACAGTGTACCCGCCCCTATCAGGAAATCTAGTACACTCCGGCCCATCAGTAGACCTA---GCAATTTTTTCCCTACACTTAGCGGGCGCCTCCTCCATCCTGGGGGCAATTAACTTCATTACAACATGCATCAATATAAAACCCAAATCTATGCCAATATTCAATATCCCCTTGTTTGTATGATCAGTGCTTATCACTGCCATTATACTTCTATTAGCCCTACCAGTACTAGCAGCA---GCAATCACTATACTACTTACAGACCGAAATTTAAATACCTCTTTCTTTGACCCTTGCGGGGGCGGAGACCCGGTACTATTCCAACACCTATTCTGATTTTTCGGCCACCCAGAAGTTTACATCCTCATTCTGCCAGGATTTGGAATTATCTCAAGTATTATTACTTTTTATACAGGGAAAAAA---AACACATTTGGCTACACTAGCATAATCTGAGCAATAATATCAATTGCAATTCTGGGGTTTGTCGTATGAGCCCACCACATATTTACAGTCGGACTAGATATCGACAGTCGAGCCTACTTTACTGCAGCAACAATAATCATTGCAATTCCAACAGGAATCAAAGTATTCGGATGATTA---GCTACCCTAACTGGCGGC---CAAATTAAATGAGAAACCCCAATCTACTGAGCACTGGGCTTTATTTTCTTATTCACTGTCGGAGGGATAACAGGGATTATCTTAGCAAACTCATCACTAGATATTGTCCTACACGACACCTACTATGTTGTAGCTCACTTCCACTATGTC---CTTTCCATGGGGGCAGTATTTGCCATCATAGGAGGACTAACCCACTGATTTCCACTATTCTCGGGGTACACTTTAAACCAAACCATAACAAAAACCCAATTCTGAGTAATATTTACCGGAGTTAACTTAACATTCTTCCCACAGCACTTTCTCGGCTTATCCGGAATACCACGA---CGCTACTCCGACTTTCCAGATGCTTTCACT---ATTTGAAACACAACCTCATCAATCGGGTCTACCATCTCCCTTATTGCCGTTCTCATATCTTTATTTATCGTATGAGAGGCACTAACATGCAAACGAGAACTA---CAAATACCACTAGGAAAAAAAACACAC
-- end --

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Hypsiglena torquata

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2007

Assessor/s
Hammerson, G.A., Frost, D.R., Santos-Barrera, G., Vasquez Díaz, J. & Quintero Díaz, G.E.

Reviewer/s
Cox, N., Chanson, J.S. & Stuart, S.N. (Global Reptile Assessment Coordinating Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of the large and probably relatively stable extent of occurrence, area of occupancy, number of subpopulations, and population size. This species is not threatened in most of its range.
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Population

Population
This species is represented by hundreds of occurrences or subpopulations. The total adult population size is unknown but undoubtedly exceeds 100,000. The species occupies a wide range and is locally fairly common. The extent of occurrence, area of occupancy, number of subpopulations, and population size are probably relatively stable. The population in Mexico is stable.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
No major threats to this species have been identified. The habitat generally tends to be unsuitable for human settlement.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Many occurrences of this species are in national parks and other well-protected areas.
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Wikipedia

Hypsiglena torquata

Hypsiglena torquata, commonly known as the night snake, is a species of rear-fanged colubrid. It is found throughout the southwestern and western United States, as well as in Mexico and British Columbia, Canada. The number of subspecies varies depending on the source, but it is generally accepted that there are 17.

Subspecies[edit]

Description[edit]

Total length is 12–26  in (30–66 cm). It is pale gray, light brown, or beige in color, with dark grey or brown blotches on the back and sides. The night snake's head is rather flat and triangular-shaped and usually has a pair of dark brown blotches on the neck. It also has a black or dark brown bar behind the eyes that contrast against the white or pale gray upper labial scales, and the pupil of the eye is vertical. The belly is white or yellowish. Females are usually longer and heavier than males.

Geographic range[edit]

The night snake has been found as far north as southern British Columbia, and as far south as Guerrero, Mexico. The eastern range of the night snake extends to Texas. Still, not much is known as far as population densities and exact range due to the highly cryptic nature of the night snake.

Habitat[edit]

The night snake is found in many differing types of habitat including: grasslands, deserts, sagebrush flats, chaparral, woodlands, thorn scrub, thorn forest, and mountain meadows. Both rocky and sandy areas are inhabited by night snakes, and elevations over 8,500 ft (2,600 m) have been recorded. The night snake is also known to inhabit mammal burrows.

Behavior[edit]

Night snakes are known to be both crepuscular (most active at dawn and dusk), and nocturnal. They are usually seen at night while crossing roads, but can be found under rocks, boards, dead branches and other surface litter during the day. Night snakes hibernate during the winter months, and are known to aestivate during periods of the summer. They are generally most active from April to October, with peaks of activity usually occurring in June.

Venom[edit]

Although the night snake poses no threat to humans, it is slightly venomous and uses this venom to subdue its prey.

Diet[edit]

Their main prey is lizards. A study in southwestern Idaho found that the night snake's diet consisted mostly of side-blotched lizards (Uta stansburiana) and their eggs. Other prey includes juvenile rattlesnakes and blind snakes, salamanders, frogs, and large insects.

Defense[edit]

If threatened, the night snake may coil up and thrust its coils at the threat, while flattening its head into a triangular defensive shape.

Reproduction[edit]

Night snakes mate in the spring, and females lay a clutch of 2–9 eggs from April to August. Eggs hatch in 7 to 8 weeks, usually in late summer. Males reach sexual maturity after one year.

Captivity[edit]

Night snakes are known to be docile and easily handled. Captive night snakes have lived over 12 years.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Reptile Database. www.reptile-database.org
  2. ^ Beolens B, Watkins M, Grayson M. 2011. The Eponym Dictionary of Reptiles. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. xiii + 296 pp. ISBN 978-1-4214-0135-5. (Hypsiglena torquata baueri, p. 19).

Further reading[edit]

  • Boulenger GA. 1894. Catalogue of the Snakes in the British Museum (Natural History). Volume II., Containing the Conclusion of the Colubridæ Aglyphæ. London: Trustees of the British Museum (Natural History). (Taylor and Francis, printers). xi + 382 pp. + Plates I- XX. (Hypsiglena torquata, p. 210; see also H. ochrorhynchus, pp. 209-210, and H. affinis, pp. 210-211 + Plate VIII, Figure 1).
  • Conant R, Bridges W. 1939. What Snake Is That? A Field Guide to the Snakes of the United States East of the Rocky Mountains. (With 108 drawings by Edmond Malnate). New York and London: D. Appleton-Century. Frontispiece map + viii + 163 pp. + Plates A-C, 1-32. (Leptodeira torquata ochrorhyncha, pp. 128-129 + Plate 25, Figure 74).
  • Günther A. 1860. Description of Leptodeira torquata, a new Snake from Central America. Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist., Third Series 5: 168-170 + Plate X., Figure A.
  • Schmidt KP, Davis DD. 1941. Field Book of Snakes of the United States and Canada. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons. 365 pp. (Hypsiglena ochrorhyncha, pp. 259-260, Figure 84 + Plate 29, center, on p. 349).
  • Stebbins RC. 2003. A Field Guide to Western Reptiles and Amphibians, Third Edition. The Peterson Field Guide Series ®. Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin. xiii + 533 pp. ISBN 0-395-98272-3. (Hypsiglena torquata, pp. 403-404 + Plate 46 + Map 180).
  • Wright AH, Wright AA. 1957. Handbook of Snakes of the United States and Canada. Ithaca and London: Comstock. 1,105 pp. (in 2 volumes). (Genus Hypsiglena, pp. 314-317, Map 30; species Hypsiglena torquata, pp. 318-330, Figures 97-101).
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