Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:671Public Records:195
Specimens with Sequences:332Public Species:39
Specimens with Barcodes:224Public BINs:57
Species:82         
Species With Barcodes:61         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Eunicidae

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Genomic DNA is available from 1 specimen with morphological vouchers housed at Florida Museum of Natural History
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© Ocean Genome Legacy

Source: Ocean Genome Resource

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Wikipedia

Eunicidae

The Eunicidae are a family of polychaetes. Many eunicids reach a considerable size. Their jaws are known from Ordovician sediments.[1] They live throughout the seas; a few species are parasitic.[1]

One of the most conspicuous of the eunicids is the giant, dark-purple, iridescent "Bobbit worm" (Eunice aphroditois), found at low tide under boulders on southern Australian shores. Its robust, muscular body can be as long as 2 m.[2]

Some species of eunicids prey on coral. Individuals have been found living unnoticed in reef aquaria for long enough to grow to great size.[3][4]

They have an evertible proboscis.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Fauchald, K. (1992). "A review of the genus Eunice (Polychaeta: Eunicidae) based upon type material". Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology (523): 1–422. 
  2. ^ Keith Davey (2000). "Eunice aphroditois". Life on Australian Seashores. Retrieved 2007-10-10. 
  3. ^ Weast, Steve. "The Great Worm Incident". Oregon, USA. Retrieved 2009-03-27. 
  4. ^ "Giant Sea Worm Unmasked as Coral Killer". Newquay, UK. 2009-03-17. Retrieved 2009-03-27. [dead link]


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