Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Algeria

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Ireland

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United Kingdom

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Found in one each Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and Pennsylvania counties; two each Maryland and Michigan counties; five New York counties; also in North Carolina and Tennessee; and in Canada reported from Ontario (one station) and Quebec. Also found in northern and central Europe (Crum and Anderson 1981), Kashmir, Algeria and S. America (Smith 1978).

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants to 2.5 × 2 mm. Stem unbranched; axillary hyaline nodules absent; central strand absent. Leaves as many as 4 pairs, lanceolate to oblong-lanceolate, acute to obtuse-apiculate, to 2.1 × 0.4 mm; dorsal lamina ending before insertion; vaginant laminae 2/5 leaf length, unequal, minor lamina narrowed, ending on or near costa; margin of dorsal and ventral laminae ± entire to crenate-serrulate, crenate-dentate on vaginant laminae, elimbate; costa percurrent to ending 2-3 cells before apex, bryoides-type; laminal cells distinct, smooth, plane, firm-walled, irregularly quadrate to irregularly hexagonal, 10-15 µm, marginal cells slightly smaller, vaginant laminal cells somewhat larger with 2-3 intralaminal rows irregularly elongate. Sexual condition rhizautoicous; perigonia gemmiform, proximal to perichaetial stems or scattered over protonemata. Sporophytes 1 per perichaetium. Seta 2-9 mm. Capsule theca exserted, erect, radially symmetric, infrequently slightly arcuate, bilaterally symmetric, to 0.7 mm; operculum 0.4-0.6 mm; peristome scariosus-type. Calyptra cucullate, smooth, 0.5 mm. Spores 11-14 µm.
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Grows on damp or wet, bare, often clayey soil, usually in woodlands but also on roadbanks and other disturbed places such as floodplains. Often associated with Ephemerum and Micromitrium (Crum and Anderson 1981).

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Fissidens exilis

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Fissidens exilis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Algeria

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N1 - Critically Imperiled

Ireland

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United Kingdom

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G3 - Vulnerable

Reasons: Fissidens exilis is a rare and local moss known from very few counties in Indiana, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Michigan, New York, Ontario, and Quebec. The moss is also known from northern and central Europe, Kashmir, Algeria and S. America.

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Notes

Comments

Fissidens exilis, first reported for North America by W. C. Steere (1950), is probably inadvertently introduced from Europe. It can be distinguished from all other tiny Fissidens in the flora area by the 2-3 rows of irregularly elongate intralaminal cells in the vaginant laminae. Plants of this species would be easily passed over were it not for the persistent protonemata that often form dark green velvetlike carpets over the substrate and the numerous sporophytes that are produced. The gemmiform perigonia are often seen scattered over the protonemata. B. H. Allen et al. (2004) have reviewed and mapped the distribution of F. exilis in North America.
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