Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Distribution: China, Russian Far East and Siberia, Europe, Greenland, and North America.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Branch leaves with chlorophyllous cells often with faint papillae on interior walls.
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Description

Plants rather robust, brownish green, tinged with brownish red when dry, in loose carpets. Stem cortex in 2–4 layers, hyaline cells small, thick-walled, without fibrils and pores; central cylinder reddish brown. Stem leaves 0.6–0.7 mm × 0.4–0.5 mm, oblong-triangular, slightly concave, blunt or cucullate pointed, slightly fringed at the apex; borders narrow, evenly differentiated throughout; hyaline cells narrowly rhomboidal, sometimes 1(–2) divided, without fibrils or pores, with irregular membrane gaps in the upper cells, membrane pleats in the lower cells on both surfaces. Branches in fascicles of 6–12, with 3–6 spreading, capitula large. Branch leaves 1.1–1.3 mm × 0.5–0.6 mm, widely recurved when dry, erect when moist, ovate-lanceolate; margins involute-concave above, gradually narrowed to a blunt, dentate apex; hyaline cells narrowly rhomboidal, fibrillose, with small, ringed, elliptic pores at the corners and ends, also near the commissures on the dorsal surface, with few rounded, unringed pores at the ends and corners on the ventral surface, the inner walls adjacent to green cells often faintly papillose; green cells in cross section narrowly elliptic, with a narrow, truncate, nearly equal exposure on both surfaces. Dioicous. Sporophytes not seen.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat: in bogs and sparsely treed woodland.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Sphagnum wulfianum

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Sphagnum wulfianum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Notes

Comments

The sporophytes of Sphagnum wulfianum are moderately common. This is the most dry-growing species in North America, typically growing in association with Sphagnum centrale, S. girgensohnii, S. russowii, and S. squarrosum. It is easily recognized as the only species that regularly has more than six branches per fascicle. The Lycopodium clavatum-like growth habit and conifer swamp habitat along with the strongly 5-ranked branch leaves make it even easier to recognize in the field.
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