Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Known from along the coast of Maine to New Jersey, also in the White Mountains of New Hampshire; Nova Scotia and New Brunswick (Ireland 1982), Newfoundland, southern Labrador, and eastern Quebec (Favreau & Brassard 1988); Scandinavia (Crum and Anderson 1981). Also found in Norway and Sweden (Crum 1984), and reportedly, Scotland (Crum 1984). However, the species is not included in the moss flora of Britain (Smith 1978).

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants moderate-sized, soft and lax, capitulum large with head branches that are typically distinctively blunt and transversely flattened; usually pale green with a weak purplish coloration evident late in the growing season, often with a weak metallic luster when dry. Stems pale green to purplish; superficial cortical cells aporose. Stem leaves lingulate to spatulate, widest above middle (1.5 times as wide as the base), 1.5-2.5 mm, apex obtuse and dentate to lacerate; border entire and little broadened at base, hyaline cells elongated-rhomboid, normally 1-septate, strongly fibrillose in distal portion, convex surface with numerous large pores and resorption gaps in apical angles, concave surface with large resorption gaps below and large resorption pores above. Branches unranked, terete. Branch fascicles with 2 spreading and 1-2 pendent branches. Branch leaves ovate, 1.3-2.5 mm, straight, not concave; apex weakly involute, broadly truncate with 6-10 conspicuous teeth; border entire; hyaline cells on convex surface with elliptic pores (4-8 per cell) along the commissures, concave surface with large round pores in distal half and proximal portion of cells. Sexual condition dioicous. Spores 26-34 µm; finely granulose-roughened.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Sphagnum nemoreum var. angermanicum (Melin) Ronning
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Growing in loose, sprawling mats or as weak, separate strands in depressions or on sides of Sphagnum hummocks in open, boggy habitats of medium acidity, in "richer poor fens," often among sedges, at the margins of ponds, lakes, and brooks (Crum and Anderson 1981).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Sphagnum angermanicum is a very soft and slender moss that often grows among sedges at the margin of ponds, lakes, and brooks. The species is found along the coast from Maine to New Jersey and also in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. The moss is known from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, Newfoundland, southern Labrador, eastern Quebec, and Scandinavia.

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Notes

Comments

Sporophytes of Sphagnum angermanicum are rare. This is a species associated with typically poor fen species such as S. flavicomans, S. bartlettianum, S. papillosum, S. pulchrum, and S. rubellum. It is usually easily recognized by its pale color and blunt, short and flattened capitulum branches, and also is limited to wetter microsites than most species of sect. Acutifolia and rarely forms hummocks. Spore characters are taken from H. A. Crum (1984).
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