Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Spanish (7) (learn more)

Overview

Brief Summary

Melospiza lincolnii

A medium-sized (5 ½ inches) bunting, Lincoln’s Sparrow is most easily identified by streaked brown back, gray breast, white throat, and reddish-brown cap. This species may be separated from the highly similar Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana) by its buff flanks streaked with brown. Male and female Lincoln’s Sparrows are similar to one another in all seasons. Lincoln’s Sparrow breeds across much of Alaska, Canada, and the northern tier of the United States, extending southward at higher elevations in the western U.S.as far as Arizona. In winter, this species migrates south to the Pacific coast of the U.S., the desert southwest, portions of the central U.S.from Texas to Alabama, and south into Mexico and Central America. On migration, Lincoln’s Sparrows may be found elsewhere in North America, including in the northeast, southeast, and Midwest. Lincoln’s Sparrows breed in wet northern forests, primarily in and around bogs. In winter, this species may be found in dry deserts, grasslands, and tropical forests. Lincoln’s Sparrows primarily eat insects in summer, but switch to seeds, berries, and fruits in winter when insects may be unavailable. Lincoln’s Sparrows may be most easily seen walking or hopping on the ground while foraging for food. This species takes short, straight flights between areas of vegetation cover, ordinarily staying close to the tops of bushes or grasses. This species is primarily active during the day.

Threat Status: Least concern

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Unknown

Supplier: DC Birds

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Breeding

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Range: BREEDING: western and central Alaska and Mackenzie across Canada through northern Saskatchewan to Labrador, south to southern California, southwestern U.S., southern Alberta, central Saskatchewan, central Michigan, New England, and Nova Scotia. NON-BREEDING: southern U.S. south regularly to Honduras, casually to central Panama; West Indies.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Size

Length: 15 cm

Weight: 17 grams

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Bogs, wet meadows, riparian thickets, shrubby forest edge, marshes, brushy fields; mostly in northern and montane areas. Also jack pine plain barrens. BREEDING: Nests on ground in area of concealing vegetation; sometimes in low bush.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: Yes. At least some populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

Migrates north through most of U.S. in April-May (Terres 1980).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Trophic Strategy

Comments: Eats insects, seeds, grain; forages on ground under grass and brush (Terres 1980, Stiles and Skutch 1989).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

General Ecology

Breeding territory about 0.4 ha (Terres 1980).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Life Expectancy

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

Maximum longevity: 7.6 years (wild)
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Joao Pedro de Magalhaes

Source: AnAge

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Reproduction

Clutch szie 3-6 (usually 4-5). Probably sometimes 2 broods per year. Incubation about 13 days, by female. Young tended by both parents, leave nest at 10-12 days.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Melospiza lincolnii

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 27 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.  Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNGCCAACCTGGGGCTCTCCTAGGAGACGACCAAGTATACAACGTAGTCGTCACAGCCCATGCTTTCGTAATGATTTTCTTCATAGTCATGCCAATTATAATCGGAGGGTTCGGGAACTGACTAGTCCCCCTAATAATTGGAGCCCCAGACATAGCATTCCCACGAATAAATAACATAAGCTTCTGACTACTCCCCCCATCCTTCCTCCTCCTCCTAGCATCATCCACCGTAGAAGCAGGCGTAGGCACAGGCTGAACGGTTTACCCCCCACTGGCTGGCAACCTAGCCCACGCCGGGGCTTCAGTCGACCTCGCAATCTTCTCTCTACACCTAGCCGGCATCTCCTCAATTCTAGGAGCAATCAACTTCATCACTACAGCAATTAACATAAAACCCCCCGCCCTCTCACAATATCAAACCCCCCTATTCGTATGATCCGTCCTTATCACCGCAGTTCTCCTACTCCTGTCCCTTCCAGTTCTCGCCGCAGGCATCACAATACTCCTCACAGACCGCAACCTCAACACCACATTCTTCGACCCCGCTGGAGGAGGGGACCCAGTCCTATACCAGCACCTCTTCTGATTCTTCGGGCACCCAGAAGTCTATATCCTAATCCTC
-- end --

Download FASTA File
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Melospiza lincolnii

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 27
Specimens with Barcodes: 30
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5B - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5B,N5N : N5B: Secure - Breeding, N5N: Secure - Nonbreeding

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size is extremely large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population Trend
Stable
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Lincoln's sparrow

Lincoln's sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) is a medium-sized sparrow.

Adults have dark-streaked olive-brown upperparts with a light brown breast with fine streaks, a white belly, and a white throat. They have a brown cap with a grey stripe in the middle, olive-brown wings, and a narrow tail. Their face is grey with brown cheeks, a brown line through the eye, and an eye ring. They are somewhat similar in appearance to the song sparrow.

Their breeding habitat is wet thickets or shrubby bogs across Canada, Alaska, and the northeastern and western United States; this bird is less common in the eastern parts of its range. The nest is a well-concealed shallow open cup on the ground under vegetation.

These birds migrate to the southern United States, Mexico, and northern Central America; they are passage migrants over much of the United States, except in the west.

They forage on the ground in dense vegetation, mainly eating insects and seeds.

They are very secretive. Their song is a musical trill, but this bird is often not seen or heard even where they are common.

This bird was named by Audubon after his friend, Thomas Lincoln, of Dennysville, Maine. Lincoln shot the bird on a trip with Audubon to Nova Scotia in 1834, and Audubon named it "Tom's Finch" in his honor.

References[edit]

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!