Overview

Brief Summary

The House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) is native to the western United States and adjacent Canada south to southern Mexico in the highlands. It was introduced to the Hawaiian Islands around 1859 and is now common on all the main Hawaiian islands from Kauai eastward. It was introduced to Long Island (New York) in the 1940s or early 1950s and has since spread so widely that it is now present year-round throughout the United States and adjacent Canada. The habitat includes arid scrub and brush, thornbush, oak-juniper, pine-oak association, chaparral, open woodland, urban areas, cultivated lands, and savanna. House Finches tend to avoid unbroken forests and grasslands and are common visitors to backyard feeders.

The House Finch diet consists mainly of seeds, buds, and berries, with few insects. The young are fed on regurgitated seeds. Except when nesting, House Finches tend to forage in flocks.

In the breeding season, males perform flight-song displays, singing while fluttering upward with slow wingbeats and then gliding down. The male feeds the female during courtship and incubation. Males may sing at any time of year and both sexes sing in the spring. House Finches will nest In a wide range of situations,but typically around four to five meters above the ground. The nest is an open cup built mainly by the female. Clutch size is 4 to 5 eggs (sometimes 2, 3, or 6). The pale blue eggs, with black and lavender dots concentrated at the larger end, are incubated by the female for 13 to 14 days. Both parents feed the nestlings. Young leave the nest around 12 to 15 days after hatching. Up to three (or even more) broods may be produced each year.

There are some migratory movements in fall and spring (mainly to winter at lower elevations in the West and lower latitudes in the East). The introduced House Finch may be competing with the Purple Finch (Carpodacus purpureus), to the detriment of the latter, in the northeastern United States.

(Kaufman 1996; AOU 1998; Dunn and Alderfer 2011)

  • American Ornithologists' Union. 1998. Check-list of North American Birds, 7th edition. American Ornithologists' Union, Washington, D.C.
  • Dunn, J.L. and J. Alderfer. 2011. National Geographic Field Guide to the Birds of North America. National Geographic Society, Washington, D.C.
  • Kaufman, K. 1996. Lives of North American Birds. Houghton Mifflin, Boston
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Distribution

Geographic Range

The native range of house finches extends from Oregon, Idaho and northern Wyoming to California, New Mexico and Mexico, eastward to the western portions of Nebraska, Kansas and Texas. In the 1940's a shipment of house finches was introduced into Long Island, New York. After struggling to survive for several years the population eventually became established and has spread throughout the eastern portion of the United States coast. They now occur from southern Canada south to the Gulf of Mexico, throughout the eastern seaboard and as far west as the Mississippi river. These newly established eastern populations have since become migratory, and now spend winters in the southern parts of the United States. House finches have also been introduced to the Hawaiian Islands.

Biogeographic Regions: nearctic (Introduced , Native ); oceanic islands (Introduced )

  • Farrand Jr., J. 1988. Eastern Birds; An Audubon Handbook. New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc..
  • Palmer, E., H. Fowler. 1975. Fieldbook of Natural History, 2nd edition. New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc.
  • Hill, G. 1993. House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus). Pp. 1-24 in A Poole, F Gill, eds. The Birds of North America, No. 46. Philadelphia: The Academy of Natural Sciences, Washington, D.C.: The American Ornithologists' Union.
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Range Description

Carpodacus mexicanus is a North American species, with a native distribution ranging from southern Canada through the U.S.A. to Mexico. The subspecies macgregori was endemic to the island of San Benito, Mexico, but became extinct in the mid-1900s (del Hoyo et al. 2010).
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Geographic Range

The native range of house finches extends from Oregon, Idaho and northern Wyoming to California, New Mexico and Mexico, eastward to the western portions of Nebraska, Kansas and Texas. In the 1940's a shipment of house finches was introduced into Long Island, New York. After struggling to survive for several years the population eventually became established and has spread throughout the eastern portion of the United States coast. They now occur from southern Canada south to the Gulf of Mexico, throughout the eastern seaboard and as far west as the Mississippi river. These newly established eastern populations have since become migratory, and now spend winters in the southern parts of the United States. House finches have also been introduced to the Hawaiian Islands.

Biogeographic Regions: nearctic (Introduced , Native ); oceanic islands (Introduced )

  • Farrand Jr., J. 1988. Eastern Birds; An Audubon Handbook. New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc..
  • Palmer, E., H. Fowler. 1975. Fieldbook of Natural History, 2nd edition. New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc.
  • Hill, G. 1993. House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus). Pp. 1-24 in A Poole, F Gill, eds. The Birds of North America, No. 46. Philadelphia: The Academy of Natural Sciences, Washington, D.C.: The American Ornithologists' Union.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

House finches are small songbirds. Average adults are 14 cm long and weigh 19 to 22 g. Their wings are about 8.4 cm long and tails are about 6.6 cm long. Females are approximately 1.3 cm shorter than males. Males have rosy-pink throats and rumps. They have a red line over their eyes, their backs are lightly streaked in red, their abdomens are whitish and streaked with brown, and they have brown-streaked wings, sides, and tails. Females are brownish overall but may also have some pale red coloration. Young house finches look similar to adult females.

House Finches may be confused with Purple Finches. Purple Finches have a more reddish color on their upper parts and are not streaked on their abdomens.

Carpodacus mexicanus may be confused with Carpodacus purpureus. Purple finches have more reddish color on their upper parts and are not streaked on the abdomen (Farrand, Jr. 1988).

Range mass: 19 to 22 g.

Average length: 14 cm.

Sexual Dimorphism: male larger; sexes colored or patterned differently; male more colorful

Average basal metabolic rate: 0.3108 W.

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Physical Description

House finches are small songbirds. Average adults are 14 cm long and weigh 19 to 22 g. Their wings are about 8.4 cm long and tails are about 6.6 cm long. Females are approximately 1.3 cm shorter than males. Males have rosy-pink throats and rumps. They have a red line over their eyes, their backs are lightly streaked in red, their abdomens are whitish and streaked with brown, and they have brown-streaked wings, sides, and tails. Females are brownish overall but may also have some pale red coloration. Young house finches look similar to adult females.

House Finches may be confused with Purple Finches. Purple Finches have a more reddish color on their upper parts and are not streaked on their abdomens.

House finches may be confused with purple finches. Purple finches have more reddish color on their upper parts and are not streaked on the abdomen (Farrand, Jr. 1988).

Range mass: 19 to 22 g.

Average length: 14 cm.

Sexual Dimorphism: male larger; sexes colored or patterned differently; male more colorful

Average basal metabolic rate: 0.3108 W.

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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House finches are found in open desert, desert grassland, chaparral, oak savannah, riparian areas, and open coniferous forests in the western United States. In their new range in the eastern United States, house finches are rarely found far from urban and suburban areas.

Habitat Regions: temperate ; terrestrial

Terrestrial Biomes: desert or dune ; savanna or grassland ; forest ; scrub forest

Other Habitat Features: urban ; suburban ; agricultural

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In the eastern United States, house finches are highly adaptable to urban and suburban environments. In fact, they are found almost exclusively in areas where buildings and lawns are present. They are also found in the open desert and desert grassland, chaparral, oak savannah, riparian areas, and open coniferous forests of the western United States, their native range.

Habitat Regions: temperate ; terrestrial

Terrestrial Biomes: desert or dune ; savanna or grassland ; forest ; scrub forest

Other Habitat Features: urban ; suburban ; agricultural

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Trophic Strategy

Food Habits

These birds almost exclusively eat grains, seeds, buds and fruits. Common seeds eaten include thistle, dandelion, sunflower, and mistletoe. In the late summer, fruits, such as cherries and mulberries, are some of their favorites. House finches will also eat flower parts and do sometimes eat insects such as beetle larvae and plant lice, but these may be eaten incidentally with seeds.

Unlike other finches of the genus Carpodacus, house finches do forage on the ground. When feeding in open areas, house finches prefer to have high perches nearby and/or to feed in large flocks.

House finches drink by scooping water into their bill and tilting their head back. Finches typically need to drink at least once per day.

Animal Foods: insects

Plant Foods: seeds, grains, and nuts; fruit; flowers

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Food Habits

These birds almost exclusively eat grains, seeds, buds and fruits. Common seeds eaten include thistle, dandelion, sunflower, and mistletoe. In the late summer, fruits, such as cherries and mulberries, are some of their favorites. House finches will also eat flower parts and do sometimes eat insects such as beetle larvae and plant lice, but these may be eaten incidentally with seeds.

Unlike other finches of the genus Carpodacus, house finches do forage on the ground. When feeding in open areas, house finches prefer to have high perches nearby and/or to feed in large flocks.

House finches drink by scooping water into their bill and tilting their head back. Finches typically need to drink at least once per day.

Animal Foods: insects

Plant Foods: seeds, grains, and nuts; fruit; flowers

Primary Diet: herbivore (Frugivore , Granivore )

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Associations

Ecosystem Roles

Carpodacus mexicanus are important seed predators and dispersers. Also, house finches provide a source of food for birds of prey, snakes, and other predators.

Ecosystem Impact: disperses seeds

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Predation

Predators of adult house finches include Felis silvestris, Accipiter cooperii and Accipiter striatus. Cyanocitta cristata, Quiscalus quiscula, Corvus brachyrhynchos, Tamias striatus, Sciurus niger, Rattus, Mephitis mephitis , snakes, Procyon lotor, and Felis silvestris are all predators of eggs and nestlings.

Carpodacus mexicanus avoid predators mostly by watching for them. They prefer to forage in groups because every member of the group helps to watch for predators.

Known Predators:

  • domestic cats (Felis_silvestris)
  • Cooper's hawks (Accipiter_cooperii)
  • striped skunks (Mephitis_mephitis)
  • raccoons (Procyon_lotor)
  • snakes (Serpentes)
  • sharp-shinned hawks (Accipiter_striatus)
  • blue jays (Cyanocitta_cristata)
  • common grackles (Quiscalus_quiscula)
  • American crows (Corvus_brachyrhynchos)
  • eastern chipmunks (Tamias_striatus)
  • fox squirrels (Sciurus_niger)
  • rats (Rattus)

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Ecosystem Roles

House finches are important seed predators and dispersers. Also, house finches provide a source of food for birds of prey, snakes, and other predators.

Ecosystem Impact: disperses seeds

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Predation

Adult house finches are most commonly preyed upon by domestic cats, Cooper's hawks and sharp-shinned hawks. Nest predators include blue jays, common grackles, common crows, eastern chipmunks, fox squirrels, rats, skunks , snakes, raccoons, and household cats.

House finches avoid predators primarily through vigilance. Groups feeding together benefit by having many individuals actively watching for predators.

Known Predators:

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Known predators

Carpodacus mexicanus is prey of:
Taxidea taxus
Falco sparverius
Red racer
Pituophis
Crotalus
Urocyon cinereoargenteus
Geococcyx velox
Lynx rufus
Serpentes
Accipiter cooperii
Mephitis mephitis
Procyon lotor
Felis silvestris

Based on studies in:
USA: Arizona, Sonora Desert (Desert or dune)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • P. G. Howes, The Giant Cactus Forest and Its World: A Brief Biology of the Giant Cactus Forest of Our American Southwest (Duell, Sloan, and Pearce, New York; Little, Brown, Boston; 1954), from pp. 222-239, from p. 227.
  • Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 16, 2011 at http://animaldiversity.org. http://www.animaldiversity.org
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Known prey organisms

Carpodacus mexicanus preys on:
Schismus barbatus
seeds of other plants

Based on studies in:
USA: Arizona, Sonora Desert (Desert or dune)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • P. G. Howes, The Giant Cactus Forest and Its World: A Brief Biology of the Giant Cactus Forest of Our American Southwest (Duell, Sloan, and Pearce, New York; Little, Brown, Boston; 1954), from pp. 222-239, from p. 227.
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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Communication and Perception

House finches use vocalizations and body signals to communicate. House finch calls are made up of "kweat" or "weet" sounds, and are used often as a way to remain in contact with a mate. The song of house finches is described as an ecstatic warble, but is not as rich as the song of purple finches. Most singing by males occurs during the first few hours after sunrise and the last few hours before sunset. Males sing to guard the female as she builds the nest. They also sing during courtship feeding and while the eggs are being incubated and the young are in the nest. Females sing during courtship feeding or mating. House Finches also communicate using visual cues, such as plumage coloration and stance of the body.

Communication Channels: visual ; tactile ; acoustic

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Communication and Perception

House finches use vocalizations and visual cues to communicate. Calls are made up of "kweat" or "weet" sounds, and are used often as a way to remain in contact with a mate. The song of house finches is described as an ecstatic warble, but is not as rich as the song of purple finches. Most singing by males occurs during the first few hours after sunrise and the last few hours before sunset. Males sing as the nest is being built to guard the female. They also sing during courtship feeding and during the incubation and nestling periods. Females sing during courtship feeding or mating. House finches also communicate using visual cues, such as plumage coloration and stance of the body.

Communication Channels: visual ; tactile ; acoustic

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Life Expectancy

Lifespan/Longevity

The oldest known Carpodacus mexicanus lived up to 11 years and 7 months in the wild. Most house finches probably live much shorter lives.

Range lifespan

Status: wild:
11.6 (high) years.

Average lifespan

Status: wild:
139 months.

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Lifespan/Longevity

House finches are known to live up to 11 years and 7 months in the wild, though most probably live much shorter lives.

Range lifespan

Status: wild:
11.6 (high) years.

Average lifespan

Status: wild:
139 months.

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Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

Maximum longevity: 11.6 years (wild)
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Reproduction

House finches are monogamous (one male mates with one female). Males and females begin to look for mates in winter, and have formed breeding pairs by the time the breeding season begins. Males try to attract a female mate by performing courtship displays, such as the "butterfly flight". In the "butterfly flight", the male flies 20 to 30 m into the air and then slowly glides to a perch while singing a loud continuous song. Males also feed their mate (called courtship feeding) and guard their mate from other males.

Females seem to prefer males that have bright red feathers. The red color comes from the foods the male eats. A very red-colored male signals that he is healthy and a good forager, and that he would therefore be a good mate.

Mating System: monogamous

House finches breed between March and August. A breeding pair may lay as many as 6 clutches of eggs in one summer, but they usually can only successfully raise up to 3 clutches. The female builds the nests, which are shallow and cup-shaped. They are made of grasses, hair, or other available fibers, and are built in shrubs, cactuses, tree cavities, buildings, on tree branches, or in bird boxes. The female lays 3 to 6 bluish or greenish-white eggs that have black spots near the large end. Each egg weighs approximately 2.4 g and takes about 13 or 14 days to hatch. The female does all of the incubation and broods the naked chicks for a few days after they hatch.

Both parents feed the nestlings and keep the nest clean by eating the fecal sacs made by the chicks. The nestlings leave the nest when they are 12 to 19 days old. The male keeps feeding the fledglings for about two weeks. The female builds a new nest and begins raising the next brood.

After they become independent, young house finches form large flocks. These young finches will be able to breed the next spring.

Breeding interval: A breeding pair may lay as many as 6 clutches of eggs in one summer.

Breeding season: House finches breed between March and August.

Range eggs per season: 3 to 6.

Range time to hatching: 12 to 17 days.

Average time to hatching: 13.5 days.

Range fledging age: 12 to 19 days.

Range age at sexual or reproductive maturity (female): 1 to 1 years.

Range age at sexual or reproductive maturity (male): 1 to 1 years.

Key Reproductive Features: seasonal breeding ; gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate)

Average eggs per season: 4.

The female incubates the eggs and broods the chicks after they hatch. The male brings food to the female but doesn't begin to help care for the chicks until a few days after they hatch. Both parents feed the chicks while they are in the nest. After the chicks leave the nest, the male usually continues to feed the chicks and the female begins building the nest for the next brood.

Parental Investment: altricial ; pre-fertilization (Provisioning, Protecting: Female); pre-hatching/birth (Protecting: Female); pre-weaning/fledging (Provisioning: Male, Female, Protecting: Male, Female); pre-independence (Provisioning: Male)

  • Hill, G. 1990. Female house finches prefer colourful males: sexual selection for a condition-dependent trait. Animal Behaviour, 40: 563-572.
  • Palmer, E., H. Fowler. 1975. Fieldbook of Natural History, 2nd edition. New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc.
  • Hill, G. 1993. House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus). Pp. 1-24 in A Poole, F Gill, eds. The Birds of North America, No. 46. Philadelphia: The Academy of Natural Sciences, Washington, D.C.: The American Ornithologists' Union.
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House finches are socially monogamous. Breeding pairs begin to form in winter, culminating in pairbonds established just before the breeding season begins. Males will engage in a courtship display known as the "butterfly flight" whereby they ascend to 20 to 30 m, then slowly glide to a perch singing a loud continuous song. They also engage in courtship feeding and mate guarding. Females appear to prefer males that have brightly colored plumage. The red plumage color is directly related to intake of carotenoid-rich foods. Bright red coloration may therefor indicate good competitive and foraging capabilities in a male, making them a desirable mate.

Mating System: monogamous

House finches breed between March and August. A pair may lay as many as 6 clutches during one breeding season, though typically no more than three of these clutches will result in fledglings. The female builds the nests, which are shallow cups constructed of grasses, hair, or other available fibers. Nests are constructed in sagebrush, saltbrush, mountain mahogany, cactuses, tree cavities, buildings, on tree branches, or in bird boxes. The female lays 3 to 6 bluish or greenish-white eggs that are spotted with black near the large end. Each egg weighs approximately 2.4 g and takes 12 to 17 (usually 13 or 14) days to hatch. The female does all of the incubation and broods the altricial chicks constantly for the first few days after hatching. Both parents feed the nestlings and remove fecal sacs from the nest by eating them. The nestlings leave the nest 12 to 19 days after hatching. The male continues to feed the fledglings for an undetermined amount of time (probably no longer than the incubation period) while the female builds a new nest and lays the next brood of eggs.

After they become independent, juvenile house finches form large flocks that congregate at food sources. These young finches will be able to breed the next spring.

Breeding interval: A breeding pair may lay as many as 6 clutches of eggs in one summer.

Breeding season: House finches breed between March and August.

Range eggs per season: 3 to 6.

Range time to hatching: 12 to 17 days.

Average time to hatching: 13.5 days.

Range fledging age: 12 to 19 days.

Range age at sexual or reproductive maturity (female): 1 to 1 years.

Range age at sexual or reproductive maturity (male): 1 to 1 years.

Key Reproductive Features: seasonal breeding ; gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate)

Average eggs per season: 4.

The young are incubated and brooded in the nest by females only. Males bring food to the female but do not participate in direct care of the young until a few days after hatching, when both parents begin an intensive period of feeding the nestlings. After the chicks leave the nest, the male typically continues to feed the chicks while the female begins building the nest for the next brood.

Parental Investment: altricial ; pre-fertilization (Provisioning, Protecting: Female); pre-hatching/birth (Protecting: Female); pre-weaning/fledging (Provisioning: Male, Female, Protecting: Male, Female); pre-independence (Provisioning: Male)

  • Hill, G. 1990. Female house finches prefer colourful males: sexual selection for a condition-dependent trait. Animal Behaviour, 40: 563-572.
  • Palmer, E., H. Fowler. 1975. Fieldbook of Natural History, 2nd edition. New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc.
  • Hill, G. 1993. House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus). Pp. 1-24 in A Poole, F Gill, eds. The Birds of North America, No. 46. Philadelphia: The Academy of Natural Sciences, Washington, D.C.: The American Ornithologists' Union.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Carpodacus mexicanus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 9 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.  Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNCATGCCTTCGTAATAATCTTCTTCATAGTTATACCCATTATGATCGGGGGGTTCGGTAACTGATTAGTCCCACTGATAATCGGAGCCCCAGACATAGCATTCCCACGAATAAACAACATAAGCTTCTGACTACTTCCCCCATCCTTCCTCCTACTCCTAGCATCCTCTACCGTAGAAGCAGGGGTTGGCACAGGATGAACAGTATACCCCCCACTAGCTGGTAACTTAGCCCATGCCGGAGCCTCAGTTGACTTAGCAATCTTCTCCCTACACCTAGCTGGTATCTCTTCAATCCTAGGAGCAATTAACTTTATCACCACAGCAATCAATATAAAACCCCCCGCCCTATCACAATACCAAACCCCCCTATTCGTATGATCCGTACTAATCACCGCAGTGCTCCTACTACTTTCACTTCCAGTACTCGCTGCAGGAATTACAATGCTCCTCACAGACCGCAACCTAAATACTACATTCTTCGACCCTGCAGGAGGAGGTGACCCAGTCCTATACCAACACCTTTTCTGATTCTTCGGCCACCCAGAAGTATACATCCTAATCCTA
-- end --

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Carpodacus mexicanus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 12
Specimens with Barcodes: 16
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be increasing, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size is extremely large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
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Source: IUCN

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Carpodacus mexicanus are common throughout their range. There are about 21,000,000 house finches in the world. Finches and many other species of birds are protected by the United States Migratory Bird Treaty Act. This means that they may not be captured or kept without a permit.

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: least concern

US Migratory Bird Act: protected

US Federal List: no special status

CITES: no special status

State of Michigan List: no special status

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Source: BioKIDS Critter Catalog

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House finches are common throughout their range. There are an estimated 21,000,000 house finches worldwide. This species is not currently protected, except by the U.S. Migratory Bird Treaty Act which prohibits capturing or keeping these birds without a permit.

US Migratory Bird Act: protected

US Federal List: no special status

CITES: no special status

State of Michigan List: no special status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: least concern

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Source: Animal Diversity Web

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Population

Population Trend
Increasing
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Source: IUCN

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Economic Importance for Humans: Negative

House finches can cause damage to orchards, including crops of peaches, apricots, plums, cherries and nectarines.

Negative Impacts: crop pest

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Source: BioKIDS Critter Catalog

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Economic Importance for Humans: Positive

Carpodacus mexicanus are a welcome visitor to backyard bird feeders. They provide much pleasure to those who welcome their song and presence as an announcement of the arrival of spring.

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Source: BioKIDS Critter Catalog

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Economic Importance for Humans: Negative

House finches can cause damage to orchards, including crops of peaches, apricots, plums, cherries and nectarines.

Negative Impacts: crop pest

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

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Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Economic Importance for Humans: Positive

House finches are a welcome visitor to backyard bird feeders. They provide much pleasure to those who welcome their song and presence as an announcement of the arrival of spring.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

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Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

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