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Overview

Brief Summary

Biology

The Chilean mockingbird is most commonly encountered foraging on the forest floor, or in low-level vegetation, for insects and fruit (2). As observed by Charles Darwin during his visit to Chile, individuals of this species often have a dusting of yellow pollen around the bill, which is acquired while feeding on small beetles found inside flowers (4). The Chilean mockingbird plays a vital role in the life cycle of the parasitic mistletoe species Tristerix aphyllus by transferring seeds to the host plant, a cactus Echinopsis chilensis. After feeding on the berries, this species defecates on the cactus, where the seeds then germinate and grow into the cactus tissue, later producing flowers and more fruits (5). The Chilean mockingbird is also occasionally the victim of parasitism. The shiny cowbird, a brood parasite, lays its eggs in the Chilean mockingbird's nest (6), which are then unwittingly incubated and brooded by the Chilean mockingbird, often to the detriment of its own offspring (6) (7).
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Description

Although unremarkable in appearance, the Chilean mockingbird's song is considered to be the finest of any Chilean bird (3). The plumage is predominantly brownish-grey on the upperparts, with dark streaks on the head, neck and back. The underparts are paler brownish-grey, becoming dirty white on the belly and buff on the flanks, with elongated brown markings. Perhaps the most distinctive features of this species are the white stripe, which runs above the eye, and the dark streak directly below, as well as the white-tipped tail feathers. The impressive vocalisations of the Chilean mockingbird consist of variable notes and phrases, along with the mimicked songs of other bird species (2).
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Distribution

Range

Coastal Chile (Atacama to Valdivia).

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Range

The Chilean mockingbird is endemic to central Chile (2).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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The Chilean mockingbird occupies a broad range of habitats, including semi-desert; lowland, succulent coastal scrub; savanna bushland; and dense evergreen mattoral, where it is most abundant (2).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Mimus thenca

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has a very large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
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Status

Classified as Least Concern (LC) on the IUCN Red List (1).
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Population

Population
The global population size has not been quantified, but this species is described as 'fairly common' (Stotz et al. (1996).

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

There are no major threats to the Chilean mockingbird at present (1).
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Management

Conservation

With a relatively wide distribution and large population, specific conservation action is not currently required for the Chilean mockingbird (1).
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Wikipedia

Chilean Mockingbird

The Chilean Mockingbird (Mimus thenca) locally known as tenca[2] is a species of bird in the Mimidae family.[3] It inhabits Chile and Argentina

Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry shrubland and heavily degraded former forest. An example habitat is the dry shrub and forest of La Campana National Park.[4] In Argentina it inhabits the dry patagonian steppes.[5]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Mimus thenca". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013. 
  2. ^ Aves de Chile
  3. ^ BirdLife International. 2004
  4. ^ C. Michael Hogan. 2008
  5. ^ Matarasso, 2008

References[edit]

  • AvesdeChile.cl
  • C. Michael Hogan. 2008. Chilean Wine Palm: Jubaea chilensis, GlobalTwitcher.com, ed. N. Stromberg
  • H. Matarasso and R. Seró López. 2008. La Tenca en la provincia de Neuquén: una nueva especie para Argentina. El Hornero. ISSN= 1850-4884, Buenos Aires. [1]
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