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Overview

Distribution

Range

French Guiana and Suriname.

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Mimus gilvus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 5 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

AACCGATGATTATTCTCAACCAACCACAAAGATATCGGCACTCTCTACCTAATCTTCGGCGCATGGGCCGGGATGGTAGGTACCGCCCTA---AGCCTCCTCATTCGAGCAGAACTAGGTCAACCTGGGGCCCTACTAGGAGAT---GACCAAGTCTACAATGTAGTCGTTACAGCCCATGCCTTCGTAATAATCTTCTTTATGGTTATACCAATCATGATCGGGGGATTTGGAAACTGACTAGTCCCCCTAATA---ATTGGAGCCCCAGACATAGCATTCCCCCGAATAAACAACATAAGCTTCTGACTACTCCCTCCATCCTTCCTCCTACTCCTAGCATCCTCTACAGTAGAGTCAGGAGTAGGAACAGGCTGAACCGTATACCCACCTCTAGCCGGCAACCTAGCCCACGCCGGAGCTTCAGTAGACCTG---GCCATTTTCTCCCTCCATTTAGCCGGTATCTCCTCAATTCTAGGGGCTATCAACTTCATCACAACAGCAATCAACATAAAACCACCCGCCCTCTCACAATACCAAACCCCCCTATTCGTTTGATCAGTACTAATCACTGCAGTGCTACTACTCCTATCCCTCCCTGTCCTTGCCGCT---GGCATTACCATGCTCCTCACCGACCGCAACCTCAACACCACCTTCTTCGACCCGGCAGGAGGAGGAGACCCAGTACTTTACCAGCATCTCTTCTGATTCTTTGGCCACCCAGAAGTCTACATTCTGATCCTTCCAGGATTTGGAATCATCTCCCACGTCGTGGCCTACTACTCAGGAAAAAAA---GAACCATTTGGCTACATAGGAATAGTATGAGCCATGCTATCCATCGGATTCCTAGGCTTTATCGTCTGAGCCCACCACATGTTTACAGTAGGAATGGACGTAGACACTCGAGCCTACTTCACATCCGCCACCATAATCATCGCCATCCCAACAGGAATCAAAGTGTTCAGCTGACTA---GCAACG
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Download FASTA File

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Mimus gilvus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 4
Specimens with Barcodes: 25
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be increasing, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size is very large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
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© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

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Population

Population
Partners in Flight estimate the total population to number 500,000-4,999,999 individuals (A. Panjabi in litt. 2008).

Population Trend
Increasing
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© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

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Wikipedia

Tropical mockingbird

The tropical mockingbird (Mimus gilvus) is a resident breeding bird from southern Mexico south to northern Brazil, and in the Lesser Antilles and other Caribbean islands. The birds in Panama and Trinidad may have been introduced. The northern mockingbird (M. polyglottos) is its closest living relative, but the critically endangered Socorro mockingbird (M. graysoni) is also much closer to these two than previously believed .[2]

Adults are 25 cm (9.8 in) long and weigh 54 g (1.9 oz). They are grey on the head and upper parts with yellow eyes, a white eye stripe and dark patch through the eye. The underparts are off-white and the wings are blackish with two white wing bars and white edges to the flight feathers. They have a long dark tail with white feather tips, a slim black bill with a slight downward curve, and long dark legs.

The sexes are alike, but immature birds are duller and browner. M. g. tobagensis, found only on Trinidad and Tobago, has darker grey upper parts and more extensive white on the wing coverts and tail than the mainland forms.

This bird has a varied and musical song, huskier than that of northern mockingbird, and may imitate the songs of neighbouring Tropical Mockingbirds, but rarely those of other birds. It will sometimes sing through the night.

This mockingbird is common in most open habitats, including human habitation. Tropical mockingbirds forage on the ground or in vegetation or fly down from a perch to capture invertebrates. They mainly eat insects and some berries. These fearless birds will also take food off unattended plates or tables. While foraging they will frequently spread their wings in a peculiar two-step motion, flashing the white wing linings, and then fold them again.

It builds a twig nest and the normal clutch is three greyish-green eggs. Incubation, by the female alone, is 13–15 days, with slightly longer again to fledging. This bird aggressively defends its nest against other birds and animals, including large iguanas, dogs and mongooses.

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Mimus gilvus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013. 
  2. ^ Hunt et al. (2001), Barber et al. (2004)

References[edit]

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