Overview

Comprehensive Description

Broad-billed Fairy-wren


Other common names: Broad-billed Wren-warbler; Campbell’s

Fairy-wren (campbelli)


Taxonomy: Todopsis grayi Wallace, 1862, Sorong, north-west New Guinea.


Male nominate race has crown and forehead mottled, with blue- tipped charcoal feathers; sky- blue brown from bill to back of head, black band from lores to nape collar, long lanceolate skyblue ear- tufts; mantle and scapulars smoky blue, grading to royal blue on lower back; upperwing and tail greybrown; below, pale sky- blue; iris dark brown; bill long,broad and  flattened, black; legs brown.

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© New Guinea Birds

Source: Birds of Papua New Guinea

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Male nominate race has crown and forehead mottled, with blue- tipped charcoal feathers; sky- blue brown from bill to back of head, black band from lores to nape collar, long lanceolate sky- blue ear- tufts; mantle and scapulars smoky blue, grading to royal blue on lower back; upperwing and tail grey- brown; below, pale sky- blue; iris dark brown; bill long,broad and flattened, black; legs brown. Female is like male except for solid charcoal- coloured crown and forehead, white belly. Immature is cinnamon- brown above, with face and malar stripe dusky, ear- tufts tawny breast and white belly; becomes blue first on brown, then on lower back and breast. Race campbelli is smaller than nominate, has crown and forehead black, and back brown.

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Source: Birds of Papua New Guinea

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Distribution

Range

N New Guinea (Vogelkop to Sepik River) and Salawati I..

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Subspecies and Distribution:



  • grayi (Wallace, 1862) - NW New Guinea from Vogelkop E to Torricelli Mts, N of main cordillera.


  • campbelli Schodde & Weatherly, 1982 - Mt Bosavi (S of cordillera), in E New Guinea.

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Subspecies and Distribution:


    * grayi (Wallace, 1862) - NW New Guinea from Vogelkop E to Torricelli Mts, N of main cordillera. *campbelli Schodde & Weatherly, 1982 - Mt Bosavi (S of cordillera), in E New Guinea.


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Source: Birds of Papua New Guinea

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Physical Description

Size

c. 14- 14,5 cm; 14- 17 g

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Diagnostic Description

Male nominate race has crown and forehead mottled, with blue- tipped charcoal feathers; sky- blue brown from bill to back of head, black band from lores to nape collar, long lanceolate skyblue ear- tufts; mantle and scapulars smoky blue, grading to royal blue on lower back; upperwing and tail greybrown; below, pale sky- blue; iris dark brown; bill long, broad and  flattened, black; legs brown. Female is like male except for solid charcoal- coloured crown and forehead, white belly. Immature is cinnamon- brown above, with face and malar stripe dusky, eartufts tawny breast and white belly; becomes blue first on brown, then on lower back and breast. Race  campbelli is smaller than nominate, has crown and forehead black, and back brown.

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Male nominate race has crown and forehead mottled, with blue- tipped charcoal feathers; sky- blue brown from bill to back of head, black band from lores to nape collar, long lanceolate sky- blue ear- tufts; mantle and scapulars smoky blue, grading to royal blue on lower back; upperwing and tail grey- brown; below, pale sky- blue; iris dark brown; bill long, broad and flattened, black; legs brown. Female is like male except for solid charcoal- coloured crown and forehead, white belly. Immature is cinnamon- brown above, with face and malar stripe dusky, ear- tufts tawny breast and white belly; becomes blue first on brown, then on lower back and breast. Race campbelli is smaller than nominate, has crown and forehead black, and back brown.

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Source: Birds of Papua New Guinea

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Understory of tall primary forest to 1000 m; particularly favours tangled vines and shrubs under broken canopy.

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Understorey of tall primary forest to 1000 m; particularly favours tangled vines and shrubs under broken canopy.

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Trophic Strategy

No data on food; presumed insectivorous. Forages in groups, usually of 2- 5 individuals; disturbs and snatches prey as group travels quickly through undergrowth. Does not join mixed- species flocks.

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No data on food; presumed insectivorous. Forages in groups, usually of 2- 5 individuals; disturbs and snatches prey as group travels quickly through undergrowth. Does not join mixed- species flocks.

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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

VOICE: Reeling song of 2- 3 seconds duration, typical of genus. Calls  noted include a high- pitched “ssss”, from foraging parties, and a very  high- pitched, sibilant slightly prolonged upslur.

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Reproduction

Only one nest found, in Oct, containing two nestlings; fledglings observed in Feb and Nov. Nest a cavity in moss, with side entrance, lined with dry needles and strips of bark, 0,5 m above ground on sapling.

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has a very large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). Despite the fact that the population trend appears to be decreasing, the decline is not believed to be sufficiently rapid to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

History
  • 2012
    Least Concern
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Not Threatened

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Not Threatened

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Population

Population
The global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as uncommon (del Hoyo et al. 2007).

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Wikipedia

Broad-billed Fairywren

The Broad-billed Fairywren (Chenorhamphus grayi) is a species of bird in the Maluridae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea.

Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.

Taxonomic note[edit]

Malurus grayi and M. campbelli (Campbell's Fairywren) (Sibley and Monroe 1990, 1993) have been lumped into M. grayi following Beehler et al. (1986), Coates (1990) and Vuilleumier et al. (1992).

A 2011 analysis by Amy Driskell and colleagues of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA showed high divergence between the two subspecies and has recommended they be resplit into separate species. It also found them to lie in a clade with the two other monospecific New Guinea genera and not with the other species of Malurus. Hence they recommend reclassifying them within the genus Chenorhamphus.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Driskell, Amy C. ; Norman, Janette A. ; Pruett-Jones, Stephen ; Mangall, Elizabeth ; Sonsthagen, Sarah ; Christidis, Les (2011). "A multigene phylogeny examining evolutionary and ecological relationships in the Australo-papuan wrens of the subfamily Malurinae (Aves)". Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 60: 480–85. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2011.03.030. PMID 21466855. 
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