Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Breeding

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Global Range: BREEDING: southeastern Arizona (common in Guadalupe Canyon, uncommon elsewhere in southeastern Arizona), extreme southwestern New Mexico, Sonora, southwestern Chihuahua, Sinaloa, and western Durango south to Guerrero, state of Mexico, Morelos, southern Puebla, and western Oaxaca. NON-BREEDING: northwestern Mexico south through breeding range to southwestern Mexico, casually to western Guatemala (AOU 1983).

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Physical Description

Size

Length: 24 cm

Weight: 56 grams

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Comments: Arid scrub, savanna, riparian woodland, clearings in deciduous forest, and open situations with scattered trees (Tropical and lower Subtropical zones) (AOU 1983). BREEDING: Apparently nests in trees. Two nests found in 1959 were located in sycamores, 15-18 m above ground (Terres 1980).

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Migration

Non-Migrant: Yes. At least some populations of this species do not make significant seasonal migrations. Juvenile dispersal is not considered a migration.

Locally Migrant: Yes. At least some populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: Yes. At least some populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

Breeding populations in U.S. and northern Mexico move south for winter; found year-round throughout most of range.

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Trophic Strategy

Comments: Probably very similar to other kingbirds that feed on a wide variety of insects and small fruits.

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Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

Clutch size 3-4.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Tyrannus crassirostris

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 2 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

ATTATATTTAATTTTTGGCGCCTGAGCCGGTATAATTGGTACCGCCCTAAGCCTTCTTATCCGAGCAGAACTAGGACAACCAGGAACCCTCCTAGGAGACGACCAAATTTATAATGTAATTGTCACTGCTCACGCTTTCGTAATAATCTTTTTCATAGTAATACCCATTATAATTGGAGGATTTGGCAACTGACTAGTCCCCTTAATAATTGGCGCCCCAGATATGGCATTCCCACGCATGAACAATATAAGTTTCTGACTACTTCCCCCATCCTTCCTTCTCCTTCTAGCTTCATCTACAGTAGAAGCCGGAGTTGGGACCGGATGAACTGTCTACCCACCATTAGCTGGCAATCTAGCACATGCCGGAGCTTCAGTAGACCTAGCTATCTTCTCACTTCACCTAGCAGGTGTTTCTTCAATTCTAGGTGCAATCAACTTCATTACTACTGCAATCAACATAAAACCACCAGCCCTATCACAGTATCAAACACCTCTATTTGTATGATCTGTACTAATCACTGCAGTTCTTCTTCTCCTGTCTCTCCCAGTCCTCGCTGCCGGCATCACCATACTATTAACAGACCGTAACCTTAACACTACATTCTTTGACCCCGCAGGAGGCGGAGATCCAGTCTTATATCAACACTTANNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
-- end --

Download FASTA File

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Tyrannus crassirostris

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has a very large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be increasing, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size is extremely large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N2B - Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Population

Population Trend
Increasing
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Wikipedia

Thick-billed kingbird

The thick-billed kingbird (Tyrannus crassirostris) is a large bird in the Tyrannidae family, the tyrant flycatchers. This bird breeds from southeastern Arizona, extreme southwestern New Mexico, and northern Sonora, (the Madrean sky islands), in the United States and Mexico, through western and western-coastal Mexico, south to western Guatemala.

This is a large tyrant flycatcher, with adults measuring 23.5 cm (9.3 in) in length.[2][3] Adults are dusky olive-brown on the upperparts with light underparts; they have a long dark brown or black tail. The underside is a dull white to pale yellow. They have a yellow patch on their crown, but is not visible very often. The bill on this species, for which it is named, is rather large-and-stocky compared to other members of this group and it is one of this kingbirds most distinguishing characteristics. The call is a loud, whistled pwaareeet.

Thick-billed kingbirds usually occur in arid or partly arid areas in streamside riparian canyons, or open areas near water. They are particularly fond of sycamore woodland edges. They make a nest in a tree branch, usually close to the trunk above 6 meters high. The female lays three to five eggs.

These birds are mostly resident in territories year round, but birds in the United States will retreat southward for the winter.

They wait on an open perch usually rather high or on top of the tree and fly out to catch insects in flight, (hawking).

References[edit]

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