Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Cyanocorax caeruleus is rare to locally common in south-east Brazil (south São Paulo south to Rio Grande do Sul), north-east Argentina (Misiones and north Corrientes). A small number of records exist for Paraguay (Ridgely and Tudor 1989, Chebez 1994, Hayes 1995, J. C. Chebez in litt. 1999), but these are not considered credible (Guyra Paraguay 2004). Populations have apparently declined substantially, particularly in the west of its range, and it is now most common in south-east Brazil (Ridgely and Tudor 1989).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Range

SE Brazil to e Paraguay and ne Argentina.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is rare to locally common up to 1,000 m in lowland evergreen, southern temperate, white-sand and secondary forest and, at least seasonally, is most numerous in Araucaria forest (Ridgely and Tudor 1989, Sick 1993, Parker et al. 1996).


Systems
  • Terrestrial
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Life Expectancy

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

Maximum longevity: 36 years (captivity)
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Joao Pedro de Magalhaes

Source: AnAge

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
NT
Near Threatened

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s
Chebez, J.

Justification
This forest-dwelling species is likely to be declining moderately rapidly throughout its range as a result of ongoing habitat destruction. It is therefore considered Near Threatened.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
The global population size has not been quantified, but this species is described as 'uncommon' (Stotz et al. 1996).

Population Trend
Decreasing
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
Agricultural conversion and deforestation for mining and plantation production historically threaten its habitat, with current key threats from urbanisation, industrialisation, agricultural expansion, colonisation and associated road-building (Dinerstein et al. 1995, Fearnside 1996).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Conservation Actions Underway
Conservation Actions Proposed
Conduct ecological studies to determine habitat requirements, tolerance of secondary habitats and fragmentation. Campaign for the protection of remaining primary forest areas within the range.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Azure Jay

The Azure Jay (Cyanocorax caeruleus) (Brazilian Portuguese: Gralha-azul - blue jay) is a passeriform bird of the crow family Corvidae. It is found in the Atlantic Forest, especially with Araucaria angustifolia, in south-eastern Brazil (São Paulo to Rio Grande do Sul), far eastern Paraguay and far north-eastern Argentina. It is the state bird of Paraná.

The Azure Jay has a total length of approximately 40 cm (16 in) and it weighs about 270 g (9.5 oz), and is the largest South American corvid. Its plumage is intensely blue with a contrasting black head and upper chest. Males and females are similar, although the females typically are smaller.

Its breeding season is from October to January. This bird is a social breeder. It lays 2–4 eggs and its nest is made of sticks. It is placed 10–20 m (33–66 ft) above the ground in an Araucaria tree.

It feeds extensively on the nut-like seeds of Araucaria angustifolia, but it is not strictly limited to this, since it also feeds on insects and fruit. As other corvids, Azure Jays are highly intelligent. Their communication is complex, consisting of at least 14 distinct vocalizations. They form groups of 4 to 15 individuals that are well organized in hierarchies. These groups remain stable for up to two generations.

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!