Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Lipaugus uropygialis is confined to the subtropical Yungas (east slopes of the Andes) of central and west Bolivia (eight known localities in Cochabamba and La Paz) and south-east Peru (Abra de Maracunca, Puno and Alto Urubamba, Cusco) (Remsen et al. 1982, B. Hennessey in litt. 1999, Bryce et al. 2005, B. P. Walker in litt. 2007). Recent records from Madidi National Park, La Paz and the north-east side of the Cordillera Cocapata, Cochabamba (Hennessey and Gomez 2003, Bryce et al. 2005) suggest that it occurs in the two largest expanses of previously unexplored Bolivian and Peruvian Upper Yungas. Gaps in its range may reflect observer coverage (J. Balderama, T. Gallick, S. K. Herzog, M. Kessler, R. S. Ridgely, J. Rossouw, T. S. Schulenberg, B. P. Walker and B. Woods per B. Hennessey in litt. 1999), or may be genuine gaps in distribution as in e.g. Southern Helmeted Curassow Crax unicornis (B. Hennessey in litt. 1999). Described as uncommon and local (Snow 1982, Ridgely and Tudor 1994), like other Andean pihas it appears to be a naturally low-density species (J. V. Remsen in litt. 1986).

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Range

S Peru (Cordillera Apolobamba of Puno) and w Bolivia.
  • Clements, J. F., T. S. Schulenberg, M. J. Iliff, D. Roberson, T. A. Fredericks, B. L. Sullivan, and C. L. Wood. 2014. The eBird/Clements checklist of birds of the world: Version 6.9. Downloaded from http://www.birds.cornell.edu/clementschecklist/download/

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It occurs in humid, subtropical, montane forest at 1,800-2,750 m (Remsen et al. 1982, J. Balderama, T. Gallick, S. K. Herzog, M. Kessler, R. S. Ridgely, J. Rossouw, T. S. Schulenberg, B. P. Walker and B. Woods per B. Hennessey in litt. 1999). Old-growth forest may be required at some stage in its life-cycle, although it has been seen in degraded forest at the Peruvian site (J. Balderama, T. Gallick, S. K. Herzog, M. Kessler, R. S. Ridgely, J. Rossouw, T. S. Schulenberg, B. P. Walker and B. Woods per B. Hennessey in litt. 1999, B. Hennessey in litt. 1999, Bryce et al. 2005). Within primary forest it is apparently restricted to specific spots, often associated with ridges, suggesting it may have unknown microhabitat requirements and therefore may not occur in all apparently suitable forests within its range (Bryce et al. 2005). It is absent from some areas of former occurrence that have now been affected by forest disturbance associated with road construction (B. Hennessey in litt. 1999). It has been seen accompanying mixed-species flocks (Ridgely and Tudor 1994, J. Balderama, T. Gallick, S. K. Herzog, M. Kessler, R. S. Ridgely, J. Rossouw, T. S. Schulenberg, B. P. Walker and B. Woods per B. Hennessey in litt. 1999). Stomach contents of one specimen comprised berries and fruit (Snow 1982), and it has been recorded eating fruit, flycatching and eating a caterpillar (J. Balderama, T. Gallick, S. K. Herzog, M. Kessler, R. S. Ridgely, J. Rossouw, T. S. Schulenberg, B. P. Walker and B. Woods per B. Hennessey in litt. 1999, B. Hennessey in litt. 1999, Bryce et al. 2005). It is unobtrusive but responds to tape playback (B. P. Walker in litt. 2007). It has been observed in groups of up to four birds, especially when displaying, but appears to be genuinely rare and local even in pristine forest (Bryce et al. 2005, B. P. Walker in litt. 2007).


Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
VU
Vulnerable

Red List Criteria
B1ab(i,ii,iii,v);C2a(i)

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Symes, A. & Butchart, S.

Contributor/s
Balderama, J., Gallick, T., Hennessey, A., Herzog, S., Kessler, M., Remsen, J., Ridgely, R., Rossouw, J., Schulenberg, T., Walker, B. & Woods, B.

Justification
This species is listed as Vulnerable because it is known from only a few locations and has a small range, which is declining owing to habitat clearance and fragmentation.


History
  • Vulnerable (VU)
  • Vulnerable (VU)
  • Vulnerable (VU)
  • Vulnerable (VU)
  • Lower Risk/least concern (LR/lc)
  • Lower Risk/least concern (LR/lc)
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