Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2014

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has a very large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
The global population size has not been quantified, but this species is described as 'fairly common' (Stotz et al. 1996) and 'common to abundant' (del Hoyo et al. 2002).

Population Trend
Stable
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Wikipedia

Russet-throated puffbird

The russet-throated puffbird (Hypnelus ruficollis) is a near-passerine bird which breeds in tropical South America in northeastern Colombia and much of Venezuela. It is commonly named in Colombia as Bobito, Utta, Tol and Coludo.

The puffbirds are an insectivorous bird family related to the jacamars, but lacking the iridescent colours of that group. The russet-throated puffbird is fairly common in dry scrub and dry forest. It excavates a burrow in an arboreal termite colony and lays three white eggs.

The russet-throated puffbird is typically 22 cm (8.7 in) long and weighs 50 g (1.8 oz). It is a dumpy bird with a large head, a long tail and a thick black hooked-tipped bill. The face is mainly white with a large yellow eye. The upperparts are brown with whitish spotting and white wing tips.

The underparts vary considerably. The two western subspecies have an off-white throat, buff underparts, and two dark brown chest bands. Some authorities split this genus into two species, the other being the two-banded puffbird, H. bicinctus.[2] The three subspecies found in Colombia and in Venezuela east of the Andes have a single breast band, a deep rufous throat and whitish or buff underparts.

This insectivore hunts from a perch, sitting and watching, then flying down to catch insects, lizards and other small prey.

The russet-throated puffbird's call is a long series of woduk notes, often given synchronously by a pair of birds.

References[edit]

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