Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:9Public Records:3
Specimens with Sequences:7Public Species:1
Specimens with Barcodes:4Public BINs:1
Species:2         
Species With Barcodes:2         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Rupicola

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Wikipedia

Cock-of-the-rock

The cock-of-the-rock, which compose the genus Rupicola, are South American cotingid birds. The Andean cock-of-the-rock is the national bird of Peru.[1]

They are found in tropical and subtropical rainforests close to rocky areas, where they build their nests.

The males are magnificent birds, not only because of their bright orange or red colors, but also because of their very prominent fan-shaped crests. Like some other cotingids, they have a complex courtship behaviour, performing impressive lek displays.

The females are overall brownish with hints of the brilliant colors of the males. Females build nests on rocky cliffs or large boulders, and raise the young on their own. They usually lay two eggs.

Except during the mating season, these birds are wary animals and difficult to see in the rainforest canopy. They primarily feed on fruits and berries and may be important dispersal agents for rainforest seeds. [2]

Species[edit]

There are two species:

The Andean cock-of-the-rock is found throughout the cloud forests of Peru.

The Guianan cock-of-the-rock is found in French Guiana, Suriname, Guyana, southern Venezuela, eastern Colombia and northern Amazonian Brazil.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Andean Cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola peruvianus), by Alfredo Begazo and Jessica Farrow-Johnson; in Neotropical Birds Online at the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology; published 2012; retrieved January 26, 2014
  2. ^ Ecology of the Cock-of-the-Rock, by Haemig PD (2012) ECOLOGY.INFO 1 retrieved January 26, 2014


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Rupicola

Rupicola is a small genus of flowering plants in the family Ericaceae.[1] The species are endemic to New South Wales in Australia and include:[2]

The genus was first formally described in 1898 by Joseph Maiden and Ernst Betche.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b "Rupicola". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government, Canberra. http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/apni?TAXON_NAME=Rupicola. Retrieved 3 March 2012. 
  2. ^ "Genus Rupicola". PlantNET - New South Wales Flora Online. Royal Botanic Gardens & Domain Trust, Sydney Australia. http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/NSWfl.pl?page=nswfl&lvl=gn&name=Rupicola. Retrieved 3 March 2012. 


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