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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 338 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 190 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 71
  Temperature range (°C): 23.159 - 28.540
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.008 - 0.565
  Salinity (PPS): 34.438 - 35.445
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.509 - 4.999
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.076 - 0.304
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.019 - 3.928

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 71

Temperature range (°C): 23.159 - 28.540

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.008 - 0.565

Salinity (PPS): 34.438 - 35.445

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.509 - 4.999

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.076 - 0.304

Silicate (umol/l): 1.019 - 3.928
 
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Asparagopsis taxiformis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 22
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Asparagopsis taxiformis

Asparagopsis taxiformis, Limu kohu formerly A. sanfordiana[1]) is a kind of red algae, one of several limu used in the Cuisine of Hawaii as a condiment.[2] Limu kohu in the Hawaiian language means "pleasing seaweed".[3] It is one of the most popular edible algae used in Hawaii.[4]

Limu kohu is a traditional ingredient in poke.

The essential oil of limu kohu is 80% bromoform (tri-bromo-methane).[5] by weight, and includes many other bromine- and iodine-containing organic compounds.[2]


Ahi limu poke.



See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ní Chualáin, F., Maggs, C.A., Saunders, G.W. & Guiry, M.D. (2004). "The invasive genus Asparagopsis (Bonnemaisoniaceae, Rhodophyta): molecular systematics, morphology, and ecophysiology of Falkenbergia isolates". Journal of Phycology 40 (6): 1112–1126. doi:10.1111/j.1529-8817.2004.03135.x. 
  2. ^ a b B. Jay Burreson et al. (1976). "Volatile halogen compounds in the alga Asparagopsis taxiformis (Rhodophyta)". Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 24 (4): 856–861. doi:10.1021/jf60206a040. 
  3. ^ Mary Kawena Pukui and Samuel Hoyt Elbert (2003). "lookup of kohu ". in Hawaiian Dictionary. Ulukau, the Hawaiian Electronic Library, University of Hawaii Press. Retrieved October 8, 2010. 
  4. ^ Mary Kawena Pukui and Samuel Hoyt Elbert (2003). "lookup of limu kohu ". in Hawaiian Dictionary. Ulukau, the Hawaiian Electronic Library, University of Hawaii Press. Retrieved October 8, 2010. 
  5. ^ Burreson, B. Jay; Moore, Richard E.; Roller, Peter P. (1976). "Volatile halogen compounds in the alga Asparagopsis taxiformis (Rhodophyta)". Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 24 (4): 856. doi:10.1021/jf60206a040. 
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