Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Dutch (1) (learn more)

Overview

Brief Summary

Channelled wrack is a small sturdy brown seaweed with gutter-shaped grooved stems. It has a smooth surface with no midrib. Channelled wrack is found high up in the tidal zone on dikes, even higher up than spiral wrack. That means it is often exposed to the air. To prevent drying up, it is covered in a layer of mucus. In addition, the gutters (channels) in the stems can retain water. Channelled wrack is only found in the Oosterschelde in the Netherlands. Due to a decreased tide resulting from the storm-flood barrier, even there it is growing rare.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Copyright Ecomare

Source: Ecomare

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Comprehensive Description

Description

 A common brown seaweed found high on the shore. It is very tolerant of desiccation surviving up to 8 days out of the water. Pelvetia canaliculata lives for about 4 years and grows up to 15 cm long. The fronds of the algae are curled longitudinally forming a channel.Pelvetia canaliculata has an obligate endophytic fungus Mycosphaerella acophylli (Ascomycetes).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

©  The Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom

Source: Marine Life Information Network

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 88 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 19 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 1.25
  Temperature range (°C): 11.471 - 12.348
  Nitrate (umol/L): 4.729 - 7.121
  Salinity (PPS): 35.184 - 35.363
  Oxygen (ml/l): 6.069 - 6.200
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.336 - 0.439
  Silicate (umol/l): 2.315 - 3.285

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 1.25

Temperature range (°C): 11.471 - 12.348

Nitrate (umol/L): 4.729 - 7.121

Salinity (PPS): 35.184 - 35.363

Oxygen (ml/l): 6.069 - 6.200

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.336 - 0.439

Silicate (umol/l): 2.315 - 3.285
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

 Pelvetia canaliculata grows attached to hard substrata on the upper shore. It is found in a band above Fucus spiralis and can tolerate ultra sheltered to moderately exposed conditions.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

©  The Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom

Source: Marine Life Information Network

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Plant / epiphyte
superficial, stromatic perithecium of Collemopsidium pelvetiae grows on live thallus of Pelvetia canaliculata
Other: sole host/prey

Foodplant / parasite
immersed perithecium of Mycosphaerella ascophylli parasitises live receptacle of Pelvetia canaliculata

Foodplant / saprobe
Orcadia ascophylli is saprobic on Pelvetia canaliculata

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Pelvetia

Pelvetia canaliculata, channelled wrack, is a very common brown alga (Phaeophyceae) found on the rocks of the upper shores of Europe. It is the only species remaining in the monotypic genus Pelvetia.[1][2] In 1999, the other members of this genus were reclassified as Silvetia due to differences of oogonium structure and of nucleic acid sequences of the rDNA.[3]

Description[edit]

Pelvetia grows to a maximum length of 15 centimetres (6 in) in dense tufts, the fronds being deeply channelled on one side: the channels and a mucus layer help prevent the seaweed drying (desiccation) when the tide is out. It is irregularly dichotomously branched with terminal receptacles,[4] and is dark brown in colour. Each branch is of uniform width and without a midrib. The receptacles are forked at the tips.

It is distinguished from other large brown algae by the channels along the frond. It has no mid-rib, no air-vesicules and forms the uppermost zone of algae on the shore growing at or above high-water mark.[5] The reproductive organs form swollen, irregularly shaped receptacles at the end of the branches. The conceptacles are hermaphrodite and borne within the receptacles.

Ecology and distribution[edit]

P. canaliculata is the only large algae growing on rocks forming a zone along the upper shore at the upper littoral zone, on the shores of the British Isles. It tolerates a wide range of exposure conditions.[6] It needs periods of exposure to the air, and sometimes grows so high up a beach that coarse grass and other longshore angiosperms grow among it. If it is submerged for more than six hours out of 12 it begins to decay.[7]

Distribution[edit]

Pelvetia canaliculata is common on the Atlantic shores of Europe from Iceland to Spain, including Norway, Ireland, Great Britain, the Netherlands, France and Portugal.[8] In Ireland, collection of Pelvetia canaliculata (Irish: dúlamán) has been recorded as a source of sustenance during times of famine.[9] A popular Irish folk song, Dúlamán, describes events transpiring between two people who collected the seaweed as a profession.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b M. D. Guiry & G. M. Guiry. "Genus: Pelvetia". AlgaeBase. National University of Ireland, Galway. Retrieved April 24, 2012. 
  2. ^ Fernando G. Cánovas, Catarina F. Mota, Ester A. Serrão & Gareth A. Pearson (2011). "Driving south: a multi-gene phylogeny of the brown algal family Fucaceae reveals relationships and recent drivers of a marine radiation". BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 371. doi:10.1186/1471-2148-11-371. PMC 3292578. PMID 22188734. 
  3. ^ Serrão, Ester A.; Lawrence A. Alice and Susan H. Brawley (1999). "Evolution of the Fucaceae (Phaeophyceae) Inferred from nrDNA-ITS". Journal of Phycology 35: 382–394. Retrieved 6-10-2013. 
  4. ^ L. Newton (1931). A Handbook of the British Seaweeds. British Museum, London. 
  5. ^ C. I. Dickinson (1963). British Seaweeds. The Kew Series. 
  6. ^ J. R. Lewis (1964). The Ecology of the Rocky Shores. The English Universities Press Ltd. London. 
  7. ^ D. Thomas (2002). Seaweeds. Life Series. Natural History Museum, London. ISBN 0-565-09175-1. 
  8. ^ M. D. Guiry & Wendy Guiry (October 25, 2006). "Pelvetia canaliculata (Linnaeus) Decaisne & Thuret". AlgaeBase. 
  9. ^ Doreen McBride, When Hunger Stalked the North (1994).
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!