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  • Profile picture of Sarah Gregg who took this action.

    Sarah Gregg changed the thumbnail image of "KQ57K Cheiracanthium erraticum BS090513-104".

    7 months ago

  • Profile picture of Sarah Gregg who took this action.

    Sarah Gregg changed the thumbnail image of "KQ57K Cheiracanthium erraticum BS090513-105".

    7 months ago

  • Profile picture of Sarah Gregg who took this action.

    Sarah Gregg changed the thumbnail image of "KQ57K Cheiracanthium erraticum GS100613-261".

    7 months ago

  • Profile picture of Katja Schulz who took this action.

    Katja Schulz selected "Cheiracanthium" to show in Overview on "Cheiracanthium".

    10 months ago

  • Profile picture of Sarah Gregg who took this action.

    Sarah Gregg changed the thumbnail image of "Cheiracanthium sp MJ7809-D014".

    10 months ago

  • Profile picture of Sarah Gregg who took this action.

    Sarah Gregg changed the thumbnail image of "Cheiracanthium sp MJ7809-D012".

    10 months ago

  • Profile picture of Sarah Gregg who took this action.

    Sarah Gregg changed the thumbnail image of "Cheiracanthium sp MJ7809-D012".

    10 months ago

  • Profile picture of Sarah Gregg who took this action.

    Sarah Gregg changed the thumbnail image of "Cheiracanthium sp MJ7809-D015".

    10 months ago

  • Profile picture of Cyndy Parr who took this action.
  • Profile picture of Cyndy Parr who took this action.

    Cyndy Parr commented on "Cheiracanthium inclusum (Hentz, 1847)":

    We just found a three-year old comment that was lost in the details tab of this species: Nancy Landrum (http://eol.org/users/39610) posted it. It was titled "They're everywhere, They're everywhere!" Nancy wrote: The kitchen, family room area, stuga in Swedish, has the old-fashioned tongue and groove knotty pine paneling, and where the paneling meets the woodwork by the floor and the ceiling, there was hardly one spot that did not contain a web nest. These spiders were everywhere and I thought nothing of them and named them "Cornsucker" spiders after the German Shepherd I had who was a rather creamy champagne color. In the other areas of the house where the color of the walls were mostly white, if I ever saw one , it's hue was more towards the gray-scale. My innate fear that any spider that wasn't black could be a brown recluse, made me study this breed closely and made note of those little dark areas on their feet. I remember my son exclaiming there was a brownish spider in the back hallway where the main part of the home is, and I asked if it looked like it was wearing shoes, and he said it did, so I say he's just "our" spider. One morning I walked into the kitchen in the dark and leaned over to turn on the light, illuminating a yellow sac on a web right in front of my gaping mouth. I could have eaten him. Since our invasion of the Pholcus, the population of yellow-sacs virtually disappeared. rarely do I see one now. In the web nests located near the floor and ceiling in the paneled room, when I would clean them down, there sometimes was a spider in them, or what was left of a spider. The leftover appeared to me to be an outgrown suit, so I always thought that's where they changed clothes. I never once saw an egg sac anywhere or baby yellow sacs, that I could identify as such. I had no idea they were biters, and nobody ever got bitten. They would spin down in front of me, crawl on tables, and I paid no attention, but I should have. I sound like I live in filth, but I don't, the room was such a perfect environment for them, with the color of the walls and all the nesting areas. I inherited them, and the first thing I noticed were the tiny nests, but just swept them away. After a few years of living with them, when I did spot one in his or her nest, I left it alone. I just read on your site that they are extremely predatory and can eat spiders larger than themselves, but were no match for the daddy-long-leg spiders when they moved in. I'm just happy I never read this article when I was living with them, or I would have bought a can of HOT SHOT. Thank you for letting me post this for even a little while. I really appreciate the opportunity to speak about such a subject with someone who has an interest in life and all it entails."

    over 1 year ago • edited: over 1 year ago

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