Overview

Distribution

Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans in temperate to tropical waters, mostly below 200 m. Short and rounded snout. First dorsal fin erectile, with a strong spine; second dorsal fin long and low. Diphycercal tail, i.e. vertebral colum runs straight to the tip, dividing the caudal fin symmetrically. Anal fin confluent with caudal fin in Hydrolagus; separate in Chimaera. Feed on small fishes and bottom invertebrates. Males with head clasper. Oviparous; large tadpole-shaped egg capsules are deposited on substrate. Dorsal spine with associated poison gland, the venom of which hurts humans.
  • MASDEA (1997).
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 325
Specimens with Sequences: 294
Specimens with Barcodes: 278
Species: 36
Species With Barcodes: 33
Public Records: 95
Public Species: 16
Public BINs: 14
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Chimaeridae

A Chimaeridae fish and deepwater mussels at edge of a brine pool.

The Chimaeridae, or shortnose chimaeras, are a family of cartilaginous fish.

They resemble other chimaeras in general form and habits, but have short, rounded snouts, without the modifications found in related families. Many species have long, tapering tails, giving them an alternative name of ratfish. Shortnose chimaeras have a venomous spine on their backs, which is sufficiently dangerous to injure humans.[1]

They are found in temperate and tropical marine waters worldwide. Most species are restricted to depths below 200 m (660 ft), but a few, notably the spotted ratfish, can locally be found at relatively shallow depths. They range from 38 to 150 cm (1.25 to 4.92 ft) in maximum total length, depending on species.[1]

Species[edit]

The 36 species are grouped into two genera:[1]

Family Chimaeridae

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2011). "Chimaeridae" in FishBase. February 2011 version.
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