Overview

Distribution

Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans mostly in tropical coastal waters. Body form intermediate between that of a shark and a skate. Also called shovelnose sharks. Numerous small, blunt teeth in jaws. Two large dorsal fins; caudal fin well developed. Denticles arranged in a row on dorsal midline. No spine in tail. They reach moderate to large size and are important commercial species in many coastal nations. Ovoviviparous. Feed on bottom organisms, including molluscs and crustaceans, but will also take small fishes.
  • MASDEA (1997).
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:586
Specimens with Sequences:358
Specimens with Barcodes:234
Species:53
Species With Barcodes:48
Public Records:101
Public Species:25
Public BINs:22
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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Guitarfish

The guitarfish are a family, Rhinobatidae, of rays. The guitarfish are known for an elongated body with a flattened head and trunk and small ray like wings. The combined range of the various species is tropical, subtropical and temperate waters worldwide. They often travel in large schools.

Description[edit]

Guitarfishes have a body form intermediate between those of sharks and rays. The tail has a typical shark-like form, but in many species, the head has a triangular, or guitar-like shape, rather than the disc-shape formed by fusion with the pectoral fins found in other rays.[2]

Classification[edit]

Nelson's 2006 Fishes of the World recognized four genera in this family: Aptychotrema, Rhinobatos, Trygonorrhina, and Zapteryx; other taxa once placed in the Rhinobatidae, such as Platyrhinoidis and Rhina, have since been moved to their own families. Recently, the genus Glaucostegus has again become recognized as distinct from Rhinobatos. The status of Tarsistes is dubious.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2011). "Rhinobatidae" in FishBase. February 2011 version.
  2. ^ Stevens, J. & Last, P.R. (1998). Paxton, J.R. & Eschmeyer, W.N., ed. Encyclopedia of Fishes. San Diego: Academic Press. p. 66. ISBN 0-12-547665-5. 
  3. ^ a b Last, White & Fahmi 2006 (2006). "Rhinobatos jimbaranensis and R. penggali, two new shovelnose rays (Batoidea: Rhinobatidae) from eastern Indonesia.". Cybium 30 (3): 262ff. 
  4. ^ Peter R. Last, Leonard J.V. Compagno and Kazuhiro Nakaya (2004). "Rhinobatos nudidorsalis, a new species of shovelnose ray (Batoidea: Rhinobatidae) from the Mascarene Ridge, central Indian Ocean". Ichthyological Research 51 (2): 153–158. doi:10.1007/s10228-004-0211-0. 
  5. ^ a b Last, P.R., Ho, H.-C. & Chen, R.-R. (2013): A new species of wedgefish, Rhynchobatus immaculatus (Chondrichthyes, Rhynchobatidae), from Taiwan. Pp. 185-198 in: de Carvalho, M.R., Ebert, D.A., Ho, H.-C. & White, W.T. (eds.) : Systematics and biodiversity of sharks, rays, and chimaeras (Chondrichthyes) of Taiwan. Zootaxa, 3752 (1): 1–386.
  6. ^ Compagno, L.J.V. & Marshall, A.D. (2006). "Rhynchobatus sp. nov. A". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.1. International Union for Conservation of Nature. 

Further reading[edit]

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Micropristis



Micropristis is an extinct genus of guitarfish from the Middle Cretaceous of what is now Lebanon.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Micropristis Capetta 1980". Fossilworks. Retrieved 23 November 2013. 
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