Overview

Comprehensive Description

General Description

This species has a reddish brown color, small punctures on the lateral parts of the pronotum, as well as small granules on the declivity. It can be distinguished from D. terebrans by its distribution as well as these characters.
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Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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This species is found in Canada (Alberta, British Columbia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Northwest Territory, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec and Saskatchewan). It is found in most US states and throughout Mexico. It has been found as far south as Honduras and Guatemala.
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One of the most widely distributed bark beetle, the Red Turpentine Beetle is common in most coniferous forests from Northern Canada to Mexico, with the exception of the SE USA. It was recently introduced to China, where it is emerging as a damaging pest of native pines.

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Ecology

Habitat

Weakened pine and spruce species with a DBH of 50 cm or more; may also attack healthy trees.
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Trophic Strategy

This species feeds on a wide range of Pinus spp. throughout its range.
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Associations

Known prey organisms

Dendroctonus valens preys on:
Pinus

Based on studies in:
USA: North Carolina (Forest, Plant substrate)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • H. E. Savely, 1939. Ecological relations of certain animals in dead pine and oak logs. Ecol. Monogr. 9:321-385, from pp. 335, 353-56, 377-85.
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Known predators

Dendroctonus valens is prey of:
Heteroptera
Platysoma parallelum
Thanasimus dubius
Temnochila virescens
Rhizophagus cylindricus

Based on studies in:
USA: North Carolina (Forest, Plant substrate)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • H. E. Savely, 1939. Ecological relations of certain animals in dead pine and oak logs. Ecol. Monogr. 9:321-385, from pp. 335, 353-56, 377-85.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flight period is from May to October. In warmer climates adults may fly all year.
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Life Cycle

This species will overwinter as partly grown larvae, or as young or mature adults. The adults will find the host tress some time after the primary attacker has attacked and weakened the tree. Egg galleries are variable. No egg niches are excavated, eggs are separated by frass. Oviposition begins in late May or June. Larvae will hatch within 10 days and then mine the phloem region in groups. The larvae will mine the phloem for at least two months. The larvae will mature and create pupal cells out of frass. Generation times vary by species. In the north a generation can take a year or longer, at southern latitudes 1.5 generations can be completed in a year.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Dendroctonus valens

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 6 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.  Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

TCG------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ATTAACAATATAAGATTCTGACTCCTACCCCCTTCTTTAACATTTTTATTATTAAGAAGAATCATTGATAAAGGAGCTGGTACTGGGTGAACAGTATACCCTCCTTTAGCCTCCAATCTATCTCACGAAGGATCCTCTGTAGAC---TGTGCGATTTTCAGTCTTCATATGGCGGGTATCTCATCTATCCTAGGGGCTATTAATTTTATCTCTACAATTATAAATATAAACCCTTCAGGAATAAAGCTAGACCGATTAACCCTATTTACTTGAGCAGTAAAAATCACAGCTATTCTATTATTGTTATCTTTACCAGTATTAGCAGGG---GCTATTACTATATTATTAACAGACCGAAATATCAACACTACTTTCTTTGACCCTTCAGGGGGAGGAGACCCCATTTTATATCAGCACTTATTTTGATTTTTTGGCCACCCAGAAGTATACATTTTAATCCTGCCAGGATTTGGGATAATTTCTCATATTATCAGACAAGAAAGAGGTAAAAAG---GAAGCTTTTGGATTACTGGGTATAATCTATGCTATAATAGCAATTGGCCTATTAGGATTTGTAGTATGAGCTCATCACATATTTACAGTAGGAATAGATGTGGATACCCGAGCCTATTTTACATCTGCTACAATAATTATTGCAGTTCCTACGGGAATTAAAATTTTTAGATGGCTC---GCCACA
-- end --

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Dendroctonus valens

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 6
Specimens with Barcodes: 7
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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This species is considered a pest throughout its range.
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