Overview

Brief Summary

Amphinectidae is an austral (Southern Hemisphere) spider family. It includes both cribellate and ecribellate taxa. The family includes 159 species (Platnick 2013), with the largest number from New Zealand, followed by Australia and then temperate South America.

Just one species occurs in North America, Metaltella simoni (a species that was at one time placed in the family Dictynidae, then Amaurobiidae, before finding a home in Amphinectidae). The natural distribution of M. simoni is believed to be Argentina, Brazil, and Uruguay, but it has been established in the United States from Florida to Texas for many years, with the first U.S. record from Louisiana in 1944. More recently, it has become established in southern California (Vetter et al. 2008) and has been found in Alberta, Canada (in a greenhouse) and in North Carolina. (Cutler 2005 and references therein). In North America, M. simoni is usually associated with human-altered habitats. It builds a tangled cribellate web under debris and adult males sometimes wander away from the retreat. Because of the relatively large size of this spider, the cribellum is sometimes visible with a magnifying glass. (Bradley 2013)

  • Bradley, R.A. 2013. Common Spiders of North America. University of California Press, Berkeley.
  • Cutler, B. 2005. Amphinectidae. P. 63 in D. Ubick, P. Paquin, P.E. Cushing, and V. Roth (eds.) Spiders of North America: an Identification Manual. American Arachnological Society.
  • Platnick, N. I. 2013. The world spider catalog, version 14.0. American Museum of Natural History, online at http://research.amnh.org/entomology/spiders/catalog/index.html.
  • Vetter, R.S., L.S. Vincent, J.E. Berrian, and J.K. Kempf. 2008. Metaltella simoni (Araneae: Amphinectidae): widespread in coastal southern California. Pan-Pacific Entomologist 84(2): 146-149.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 53
Specimens with Sequences: 53
Specimens with Barcodes: 52
Species: 3
Species With Barcodes: 3
Public Records: 1
Public Species: 1
Public BINs: 1
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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Amphinectidae

The Amphinectidae are a spider family with about 180 described species in 35 genera.

The family Neolanidae, with its only genus Neolana, was merged into this family in 2005.[1]

Distribution[edit source | edit]

This family is almost exclusively confined to New Zealand and the Australian region, with only Metaltella found in South America from Argentina to Brazil, and Calacadia in Chile.

Metaltella simoni has been introduced in a large part of the Southern United States (records exist from California, Louisiana, Mississippi and Florida) and is considered an invasive species in Florida. It is feared that it could extirpate the native titanoecid species Titanoeca brunnea.

Genera[edit source | edit]

See also[edit source | edit]

Footnotes[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ Griswold et al. 2005

References[edit source | edit]

  • Davies, Valerie Todd (2002): Tasmabrochus, a new spider genus from Tasmania, Australia (Araneae, Amphinectidae, Tasmarubriinae). Journal of Arachnology 30: 219-226. PDF
  • Edwards, G.B.: (Cribellate Spider, Metaltella simoni (Keyserling) (Arachnida: Araneae: Amphinectidae) HTML (with pictures)
  • Griswold, C. E., M. J. Ramírez, J. A. Coddington & N. I. Platnick (2005): Atlas of phylogenetic data for entelegyne spiders (Araneae: Araneomorphae: Entelegynae) with comments on their phylogeny. Proc. Calif. Acad. Sci. 56(Suppl. II): 1-324.
  • Platnick, Norman I. (2008): The world spider catalog, version 8.5. American Museum of Natural History.
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