Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:3Public Records:0
Specimens with Sequences:2Public Species:0
Specimens with Barcodes:2Public BINs:0
Species:1         
Species With Barcodes:1         
          
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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Abrocomidae

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Wikipedia

Chinchilla rat

Chinchilla rats or chinchillones are members of the family Abrocomidae. This family has few members compared to most rodent families, with only 9 known living species. They resemble chinchillas in appearance, with a similar soft fur and silvery-grey color, but have a body structure more like a short-tailed rat. They are social, tunnel-dwelling animals, and live in the Andes Mountains of South America. They are probably herbivorous, although this is not clear.[1]

They can be described as medium-sized. Stiff hairs project over the three middle digits of the rear feet. Their massive skulls narrow in the facial areas.[2] Some molecular work,[3] suggests that, despite their appearance, they may be more closely related to octodontoids such as degus, nutria, and tuco-tucos than they are to chinchillas and viscachas.

Etymology[edit]

The family name is derived from the Ancient Greek word ἁβροκόμης (habrokomēs, "with delicate hair"). The word ἁβρός (habros) means "delicate, graceful" and the word κόμη (komē) means "hair".

Species[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bishop, Ian (1984). Macdonald, D., ed. The Encyclopedia of Mammals. New York: Facts on File. p. 701. ISBN 0-87196-871-1. 
  2. ^ Allaby, Michael. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Zoology. pg 1. Oxford University Press. New York. 1992.
  3. ^ Huchon, D. and E. J. P. Douzery (2001). "From the Old World to the New World: a molecular chronicle of the phylogeny and biogeography of hystricognath rodents". Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 20 (2): 238–251. doi:10.1006/mpev.2001.0961. PMID 11476632. 
  • Braun, J. K. and M. A. Mares. 2002. Systematics of the Abrocoma cinerea species complex (Rodentia: Abrocomidae), with a description of a new species of Abrocoma. Journal of Mammalogy, 83:1-19.
  • Emmons, L. H. 1999. A new genus and species of abrocomid rodent from Peru (Rodentia: Abrocomidae). American Museum Novitas, 3279:1-14.
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