Physical Description

Morphology

Other Physical Features: endothermic ; bilateral symmetry

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Ecology

Associations

Animal / dung saprobe
apothecium of Ascobolus brassicae is saprobic in/on dung or excretions of dung of Rodentia

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
attached Aspiculuris tetraptera endoparasitises colon of Rodentia

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Animal / parasite / endoparasite
Babesia microti endoparasitises red blood cells of Rodentia

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
Capillaria endoparasitises intestine of Rodentia

Animal / dung saprobe
sessile apothecium of Coprotus albidus is saprobic in/on dung or excretions of dung of Rodentia

Animal / parasite / ectoparasite / blood sucker
Ctenophthalmus nobilis sucks the blood of Rodentia

Animal / dung saprobe
apothecium of Fimaria hepatica is saprobic in/on dung or excretions of dung of Rodentia

Animal / parasite / ectoparasite / blood sucker
nymph of Ixodes ricinus sucks the blood of Rodentia

Animal / parasite / ectoparasite / blood sucker
female of Ixodes trianguliceps sucks the blood of body of Rodentia

Animal / dung saprobe
sporangiophore of Kickxella alabastrina is saprobic in/on dung or excretions of dung of Rodentia

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
spirally coiled worm of Longistriata endoparasitises ilium of Rodentia

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
spirally coiled worm of Nematospiroides dubius endoparasitises small intestine of Rodentia

Animal / dung saprobe
sporangiophore of Phycomyces nitens is saprobic in/on dung or excretions of dung of Rodentia

Animal / dung saprobe
sporangiophore of Rhopalomyces magnus is saprobic in/on dung or excretions of dung of Rodentia

Animal / dung saprobe
perithecium of Schizothecium glutinans is saprobic in/on dung or excretions of dung of Rodentia

Animal / dung saprobe
perithecium of Schizothecium nanum is saprobic in/on dung or excretions of dung of Rodentia

Animal / dung saprobe
perithecium of Schizothecium tetrasporum is saprobic in/on dung or excretions of dung of Rodentia

Animal / dung saprobe
perithecium of Schizothecium vesticola is saprobic in/on dung or excretions of dung of Rodentia

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
Syphacia endoparasitises caecum of Rodentia

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
larva of Toxocara canis endoparasitises tissue of Rodentia

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
Toxoplasma endoparasitises macrophage of Rodentia

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Known predators

Rodentia is prey of:
predatory invertebrates
Aves
Serpentes
Varanidae
Erinaceus europaeus
Felis silvestris libyca
Vulpes vulpes
Accipiter badius
Canis lupus
Canis lupus familiaris

Based on studies in:
Japan (Forest)
India, Rajasthan Desert (Desert or dune)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Y. Kitazawa, Ecosystem metabolism of the subalpine coniferous forest of the Shigayama IBP area. In: Ecosystem Analysis of the Subalpine Coniferous Forest of Shigayama IBP Area, Central Japan, Y. Kitazawa, Ed. (Japanese Committee for the International Biol
  • I. K. Sharma, A study of ecosystems of the Indian desert, Trans. Indian Soc. Desert Technol. and Univ. Center Desert Stud. 5(2):51-55, from p. 52 and A study of agro-ecosystems in the Indian desert, ibid. 5:77-82, from p. 79 1980).
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Known prey organisms

Rodentia preys on:
leaves
Eleucine
Cyperus
Cenchrus
Zizyphus
Crotalaria
Isoptera
Coleoptera
Hymenoptera
Auchenorrhyncha
Cebus olivaceus

Based on studies in:
Japan (Forest)
India, Rajasthan Desert (Desert or dune)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Y. Kitazawa, Ecosystem metabolism of the subalpine coniferous forest of the Shigayama IBP area. In: Ecosystem Analysis of the Subalpine Coniferous Forest of Shigayama IBP Area, Central Japan, Y. Kitazawa, Ed. (Japanese Committee for the International Biol
  • I. K. Sharma, A study of ecosystems of the Indian desert, Trans. Indian Soc. Desert Technol. and Univ. Center Desert Stud. 5(2):51-55, from p. 52 and A study of agro-ecosystems in the Indian desert, ibid. 5:77-82, from p. 79 1980).
  • Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 16, 2011 at http://animaldiversity.org. http://www.animaldiversity.org
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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Perception Channels: tactile ; chemical

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Reproduction

Key Reproductive Features: gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); sexual

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Evolution and Systematics

Functional Adaptations

Functional adaptation

Tail shedding allows escape: rodents
 

The tails of many rodents assist escape from predators because they can be shed..

   
  Certain species of rodent can also shed their tails. "According to the authoritative mammalian encyclopedia Walker's mammals of the World (1999), edited by Dr. Ronald M. Nowak, these include deer mice, rock rats, spiny mice, spiny rats, and dassie rats (not to be confused with true dassies, the hyrax subungulates). As with lizards, rodent tail-shedding involves the breaking off of all or part of the tail, allowing the rodent to escape. A partial replacement of the lost tail subsequently develops." (Shuker 2001:132-133)
  Learn more about this functional adaptation.
  • Shuker, KPN. 2001. The Hidden Powers of Animals: Uncovering the Secrets of Nature. London: Marshall Editions Ltd. 240 p.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:22531
Specimens with Sequences:20244
Specimens with Barcodes:17431
Species:998
Species With Barcodes:891
Public Records:14349
Public Species:503
Public BINs:1148
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Barcode data

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