Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Plants with bulbs. Leaves thick and glossy, persistent. Flowers in a compact umbel, subtended by green spathe-valves. 3 outer perianth segments narrower than inner. Corona 0. Ovules few, 5-6, in each loculus. Fruit a red berry with large spherical seeds.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / spot causer
Colletotrichum coelomycetous anamorph of Colletotrichum cliviae causes spots on live leaf of Clivia

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / spot causer
innate, scattered pycnidium of Dendrophoma coelomycetous anamorph of Dendrophoma convallariae var. cliviae causes spots on live leaf (base) of Clivia

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:139
Specimens with Sequences:322
Specimens with Barcodes:194
Species:10
Species With Barcodes:10
Public Records:32
Public Species:7
Public BINs:0
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Clivia sp. nov.1Umtentu

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Clivia

Clivia (pronounced /ˈklaɪviə/)[1] is a genus of monocot flowering plants native to southern Africa. They are from the family Amaryllidaceae, subfamily Amaryllidoideae.[2] Common names include Kaffir lily and bush lily.

They are herbaceous evergreen plants, with green, strap-like leaves. Flowers are bell-shaped flowers on a stalk above the foliage, and they are can be any color except blue, black, and brown.[3][not in citation given]

Contents

Species

Of the six known species, Clivia miniata is the most widely cultivated, and hybrid varieties with flowers ranging from deep red-orange to pale yellow have been bred by growers.

C. miniata, C. gardenii, C. robusta and C. caulescens seedlings flower after three to four years, while the yellow varieties may take longer. C. nobilis will flower after seven or eight years. It is reported that C. mirabilis also takes about 6 years to flower.

Specimens were gathered by British explorers William Burchell and John Bowie in 1815 and 1820, respectively. Clivia nobilis became the first named species when in 1828 the Kew botanist John Lindley named it in honor of Lady Charlotte Florentia Clive, Duchess of Northumberland (1787–1866)[4] (wife of Hugh Percy, 3rd Duke of Northumberland), who was for a time the governess of the future Queen Victoria.[5][6][7]

Blooming Season

It blooms from February to May (Northern Hemisphere) and July to September in Southern Africa (reference SBN360 00203 X - Jeppe), with appropriate cool treatment, also at Christmas.

Watering, Feeding

Water regularly in summer, but avoid overwatering. From Autumn till late Winter maintain a resting period, keep plants almost dry at 46-50 degrees F (8-10 degrees C). From Spring fertilize every 14 days.

Further Culture

When new leaves grow and the flower shaft develops, mist. Wipe leaves occasionally with a damp cloth if dusty from indoor culture. Repot plants yearly or biyearly in all-purpose potting medium or coco husks,offsets may be removed when repotting, but allow offset to be sufficiently developed to successfully grow on independently.

Pests, Diseases

Scale, Mealy bug,Rot

Tips

If your Clivia does not bloom, it may be because the cool resting period has not been provided, the amount of water was increased too soon in the spring (the flower stalk should be at least 6 inches [15 cm] high), or watering was insufficient during the main growth phase of the flower stalk. Also, it takes 4-6 years for first flowering.

Australia

Clivia are popular as garden plantings with many public mass plantings of older original miniatas and interspecifics. There are also groups of hobbyists growers who meet regularly to learn more and display newer improved speciems. In Melbourne, the Melbourne Clivia Group meet to share information and promote the culture of clivia. Toowoomba in Queensland also has a club, where magnificent Spring Carnival of Flowers occurs.

Warning!

Clivias contain poisonous alkaloids.

Notes and references

  1. ^ Western Garden Book. Sunset Books. 1995. pp. 606–607. ISBN 0376038519. 
  2. ^ Stevens, P.F. (2001 onwards), Angiosperm Phylogeny Website: Asparagales: Amaryllidoideae, http://www.mobot.org/mobot/research/apweb/orders/asparagalesweb.htm#AllAma 
  3. ^ "Clivias". http://greenplants.ca/clivia_care.html. Retrieved 2009-12-06. 
  4. ^ Clivia San Marcos Growers. URL accessed April 8, 2006.
  5. ^ Clivia Forum. A Clivia discussion Forum.
  6. ^ Clivia Indonesia. Indonesia Clivia Forum.
  7. ^ Clivia Base. South African Clivia Website.
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