Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Northern and central Europe; eastern Asia; reported from Japan. Alaska and the Canadian Northwest to British Columbia; Labrador; Nova Scotia west to Michigan, south to New York and New Jersey. Also reported from Greenland and Costa Rica (Crum et al. 1981).

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Distribution: Europe, Japan, North America, and Russian Far East.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants to 6 mm (or rarely, when sterile, to 30 mm), in dull, yellow-brown tufts. Leaves 2.5-3 mm, erect-spreading and flexuose or secund, linear-lanceolate, gradually subulate, slenderly acute or ± blunt; margins erect, entire or slightly serrulate near the apex; costa long-excurrent, occupying about 1/2 the leaf base; distal cells long-rectangular, 5-10:1. Sexual condition dioicous. Seta 5-6(-12) mm, yellow, becoming brownish with age. Capsule 0.7-1 mm, nodding and curved-asymmetric, short-oval, strumose, furrowed when dry and empty; annulus a single row of small, persistent cells; operculum slenderly long-rostrate, curved; peristome teeth 270-350 µm, divided 1/2 length distally or more. Spores 16-21 µm, smooth to indistinctly roughened.
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Description

Plants minute to small, 2–10 mm high, dull green or yellowish brown, in tufts. Stems erect, simple or branched. Leaves 1.0–1.5 mm long, lower ones slightly falcate, narrowly lanceolate, upper ones erect-spreading to flexuose or falcate-secund, linear-lanceolate, abruptly narrowed from a sheathing base to a long, channeled subula; margins plane, entire or serrulate near the apex; costa broad, occupying ca. ½ the leaf base width, long-excurrent, smooth at back; upper leaf cells short- to long-rectangular, 16–40 µm × 4–8 µm; lower cells shorter. Dioicous. Perichaetial leaves similar to upper stem leaves. Setae straight, (5–)8–10(–15) mm long, yellow to yellowish brown; capsules ovoid, inclined, slightly curved, strumose, furrowed when dry and empty; opercula slenderly long-rostrate, curved, 0.5–1.0 mm long; annuli in 1 row of small, thick-walled cells, persistent; peristome teeth divided to the middle or lower, vertically pitted-striolate below. Spores 15–21 µm in diameter, smooth or finely roughened.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Dicranum cerviculatum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 149. 1801; Bartleya ohioensis H. Robinson; Dicranella cerviculata var. americana Grout; D. cerviculata var. pusilla (Hedwig) Schimper; D. ohioensis (H. Robinson) H. A. Crum; D. polaris Kindberg; D. pusilla (Hedwig) E. Britton; Dicranum pusillum Hedwig
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Type Information

Isotype for Dicranella cerviculata var. americana Grout
Catalog Number: US
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): E. D. Merrill
Year Collected: 1898
Locality: Katahdin Ironworks., Maine, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Grout, A. J. 1904. Moss Handl. Microsc. 92.
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Holotype for Bartleya ohioensis H. Rob.
Catalog Number: US
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Card file verified by examination of alleged type specimen
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): F. Bartley
Year Collected: 1964
Locality: 3 mi S of Buckeye Furnace., Jackson, Ohio, United States, North America
  • Holotype: Robinson, H. 1966. Bryologist. 69: 105.
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Found growing on wet sand, clay, or peaty soil, on banks of roads and other disturbed habitats (Crum et al. 1981).

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Habitat: on wet sandy soil near streams, roadsides or open fields.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Found growing on wet sand, clay, or peaty soil, on banks of roads and other disturbed habitats. Northern and central Europe; eastern Asia; reported from Japan. Alaska and the Canadian Northwest to British Columbia; Labrador; Nova Scotia west to Michigan, south to New York and New Jersey. Also reported from Greenland and Costa Rica.

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Notes

Comments

The leaves of Dicranella cerviculata are not wide-spreading from a clasping base, and the perichaetial leaves are scarcely differentiated from stem leaves. The costa occupies about 1/2 of the leaf base. The nodding, asymmetric, strumose capsule becomes variously striate or furrowed when dry and empty. Bartleya ohioensis, known solely from sterile material from West Virginia and Ohio, differs from D. cerviculata only in having a somewhat better development of stereids in the costa. The report from Maryland (as B. ohioensis) was by H. Robinson and C. F. Reed (1987) and from Wisconsin by F. D. Bowers and S. K. Freckmann (1979). In Northwest Territories it is known only from Great Bear Lake and the Tuktoyaktuk Peninsula.
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