Overview

Brief Summary

Matriarchal Katydid (Saga pedo)

Identification: Forelegs adapted for holding prey; rows of strong spines along inside and outside lower edges of femur and tibia. No males; females large and wingless. Known only from Jackson County, Michigan. Length 60–65 mm.

Habitat: Old fields.

Season: August and September. Eggs apparently require more than one winter to hatch.

Similar species: None.

Remarks: A reasonable hypothesis as to how the matriarchal katydid was brought to Michigan is that one or more of its eggs were in soil adhering to farm equipment returning from plowing contests in Italy. The first Michigan specimen was collected in 1970 and only six have been taken since. Unlike our native katydids and other species of Saga in Europe, the matriarchal katydid is obligatorily parthenogenetic. No males are known from here or from Europe. Even though there is no male calling song, females have prominent tympanal organs on the fore tibiae.

A caged female captured and avidly ate grasshoppers. She inserted eggs in soil to a depth of about 25 mm.

More information: subfamily Saginae

References: Cantrall 1972.

  • Cantrall IJ. 1972. Saga pedo (Pallas) (Tettigoniidae: Saginae) an old world katydid new to Michigan. Gt. Lakes Entomol. 5: 103-106.
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Distribution

Range Description

Has a highly scattered distribution across southern European countries.
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Source: IUCN

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This "Matriarchal katydid" is one of the largest insects in Europe (12 cm in length). It is a carnivore and parthenogenetic grasshopper.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Saga pedo

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Saga pedo

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 9
Specimens with Barcodes: 20
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
VU
Vulnerable

Red List Criteria
B1+2bd

Version
2.3

Year Assessed
1996
  • Needs updating

Assessor/s
Orthopteroid Specialist Group

Reviewer/s

Contributor/s

History
  • 1994
    Vulnerable
    (Groombridge 1994)
  • 1990
    Vulnerable
    (IUCN 1990)
  • 1988
    Vulnerable
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1988)
  • 1986
    Vulnerable
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1986)
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Wikipedia

Saginae

The Saginae are the Predatory Katydids or Predatory Bush-crickets, a Subfamily of the Family Tettigoniidae (the Katydids, long-horned grasshoppers or bush-crickets). The Saginae are specialist carnivores, which is unusual among the Orthoptera.[1] Their specialist carnivory and appropriately adapted digestive tracts even were regarded as unique in the order Orthoptera, but at least some members of two other subfamilies, the Austrosaginae and Listroscelidinae are partly or completely predatory as well, and until recently those subfamilies were included in the Saginae.

Overview[edit]

Members of the Saginae are gracile and elongated in build compared to say, most locusts or crickets, but their four anterior walking legs, as opposed to their two posterior leaping legs, are powerful and lined with spines, mainly along their inner edges. They apply those inner spines in clasping their prey. Some species have spines on the outer surfaces and on the leaping legs as well; those external spines probably are defensive in function. The jaws of Saginae are not spectacular, but are large, powerful, sharp, and businesslike, as befits predators, and the insects do not hesitate to bite when handled.

The Saginae are large insects, some species with a body length of more than 50 mm, not counting the antennae or ovipositor, which are long, typically about as long as the body.

The ovipositor is long and sword-like, and used for oviposition in soil.

Saga pedo about to oviposit an egg in the soil.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Holm, E., Scholtz, C. H. (1985). Insects of southern Africa. London: Butterworths. ISBN 0-409-10487-6. 

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Saga pedo

Saga pedo is a species of bush cricket, spread throughout the European part of the Mediterranean, and Asia as far east as China. It is a wingless bush cricket, with the body size of up to 12 centimetres (4.7 in), which makes it one of the largest European insects.[1] Colloquially known as the predatory bush cricket, or the Spiked Magician (due to the "enchanting" manner in which it waves its forelimbs as it approaches its prey),[2] it is uncommon among its kind due to its carnivorous lifestyle, most often preying on smaller insects, with a known tendency towards cannibalism as well.[3] For this purpose, it has strong fore and mid legs, equipped with sharp spines. When these animals are hunting, they move about, catching their prey by suddenly leaping on them and grabbing them with their legs. Their prey is usually killed by biting into the throat, and eating is done at capture. Saga pedo is active at dusk and during nighttime, with activity slowly expanding through the day at the end of the season.[3]

Life cycle[edit source | edit]

The female attains sexual maturity three to four weeks after hatching and starts laying eggs. A single egg is deposited by stabbing the long, sharp ovipositor into the soil at a suitable site. The female will lay from twenty five to eighty eggs. Development depends largely on the ambient temperature. At 20°C or more, the eggs start to develop immediately, the nymphs hatching after approximately 40 to 85 days (again depending on the temperature). At colder conditions, the eggs enter diapause, which is a delay in development and can result in the eggs remaining buried for up to five years (mostly two to three). After hatching, which occurs around May, the nymphs go through six or seven instars before attaining sexual maturity, and live for four to six months after that.[3]

Saga pedo is also uncommon in that it mostly reproduces asexually, with parthenogenesis. The population therefore appears to consist solely of females and there is no reliable record of a male of this species.[3] They also have the largest number of chromosomes among members of the genus Saga - 68 - and are probably tetraploid.[4]

Ecology and distribution[edit source | edit]

Adults are eaten by birds, insectivores, rodents, lizards, frogs, and toads. Nymphs are eaten by spiders, scorpions, centipedes, and preying insects.[3]

Saga species inhabit both dry and wet meadows, pastures, shrubby hillsides, gorges, and as well follow grain fields and vineyards in southern Europe and western Asia from the Iberian peninsula across central Europe and central Asia to China. Like other Saga species, S. pedo is comfortable with adverse weather conditions, and can be found in habitats from sea level to altitudes up to about 1500 m, and occasionally higher. The southernmost known locality is Sicily, while the northernmost is in Kurgan Oblast, Russia, at latitude 54º30' N.[3] Its range is vast, but the population is spread thinly, threatened by insecticide use and habitat destruction. Therefore, the species is considered vulnerable at a global scale.[1]

Saga pedo was reported as an accidental introduction from Europe into Tompkins Township, Jackson County, Michigan (USA) in 1970. In all, only six specimens were found from 1970 to 1972, during August and September.[5] None have been found since by a reliable authority, so they are considered extinct from North America.[3] There have been occasional unconfirmed sightings in subsequent decades, and catching of several specimens in Michigan from 2004 on were reported by a local high school teacher in the New York Biology Teachers Association's publication, however, this remains to be confirmed by a scholarly source.[6]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ a b c Orthopteroid Specialist Group (1996). "Saga pedo (Predatory Bush Cricket)". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 4. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 2011-02-11. 
  2. ^ Blondel, J., Aronson, J., Bodiou, J-Y. and Boeuf, G. (2010) The Mediterranean Region. Biological Diversity in Space and Time. Third Edition. Oxford University Press, Oxford
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Van Helsdingen, P.J.; Willemse, L.; Speight, M.C.D. (eds.) (1996). "Saga pedo (Pallas, 1771)". Background information on invertebrates of the Habitats Directive and the Bern Convention. Part II - Mantodea, Odonata, Orthoptera and Arachnida. Council of Europe. pp. 383–387. 
  4. ^ Goldschmidt, E. (1946). "Polyploidy and Parthenogenesis in the Genus Saga". Nature 158 (4017): 587–588. doi:10.1038/158587c0. 
  5. ^ Cantrall, Irving J. (1972). "Saga pedo (Pallas) (Tettigoniidae: Saginae), an Old World Katydid, new to Michigan". The Great Lakes Entomologist 5 (3): 103–106. 
  6. ^ Cunningham, John (2009). "The Saga Saga". Adaptation. 
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