Overview

Distribution

Distribution: China, Japan, Nepal, India, and Myanmar.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.0 of 5

Global Range: Known from New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee, and east and central Asia (FNA, vol. 27, 2007).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.0 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Leaves dense, hiding the stem, long-lanceolate to linear-elliptical and commonly weakly constricted beyond the short-sheathing base, (1-)1.5-1.8(-2) mm; apex narrowly acute to acuminate, occasionally blunt, apiculus narrowly triangular; margins 1-stratose; costa regularly excurrent into a short or long, stout mucro of several cells. Specialized asexual reproduction absent. Sporophytes absent in range of flora.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

Plants usually small, 5–14(–16) mm high, yellowish green, in dense tufts. Stems erect, simple or with sympodial branches; in cross section outer cortical cells small, thick-walled, central strand absent or weakly differentiated. Leaves crisped or curved-contorted when dry, erect-spreading when moist, lanceolate to linear-lanceolate, 0.8–2.0 mm x 0.15–0.30 mm, acuminate or more or less acute at the apex, always constricted above the base; margins entire above, crenulate at shoulder portion of the base because of papillose cells; costa shortly excurrent; upper and median laminal cells irregularly hexagonal to rounded, 5–12 µm x 6–10 µm, with pluripapillae; basal cells irregularly rectangular to oblong, 8–20 µm x 6–12 µm, thick-walled, smooth; abaxial superficial cells of costa above the mid-leaf linear-rectangular. Inner perichaetial leaves broad-oblong, attenuate, 0.4–1.0 mm x 0.2–0.5 mm. Setae yellowish brown, 6–10 mm long, more or less twisted; capsules erect, ovoid to shortly cylindrical, ca. 1.2 mm long; stomata present in the neck of capsule. Spores spherical, pale, brownish green, 10–13 µm in diameter.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Anoectangium leptophyllum Broth. in Handel-Mazzetti, Symb. Sin. 4: 30. 1929. Type. China: Yunnan, Handel-Mazzetti 679 (holotype H). Anoectangium perminutum Broth., Akad. Wiss. Wien Sitzungsber., Math.-Naturwiss. Kl., Abt. 1, 133: 563. 1924. Type. China: Yunnan, Handel-Mazzetti 338 (holotype H). Anoectangium stracheyanum var. gymnostomoides (Broth. & Yas.) Wijk & Marg., Taxon 7: 288. 1958. Anoectangium gymnostomoides Broth. & Yas., Bot. Mag. (Tokyo) 19: 150. 1915. Anoectangium tortifolium Jaeg., Ber. Thätigk. St. Gallischen Naturwiss. Ges. 1869–70: 286. 1870.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Synonym

Anoectangium peckii Sullivant
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat: often on rocks or boulders in alpine regions, near 5000 m, also at lower elevations on stone walls or in crevices.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

Anoectangium stracheyanum was previously treated as a synonym of A. aestivum (R. H. Zander 1977), but further study indicates that it is a good match for the Asian A. stracheyanum, in the weakly wasp-waisted, narrow leaves with a rather strong, commonly multicellular apiculus, and papillose-crenulate or weakly denticulate basal laminal margins. The “wasp-waist” referred to by Asian authors is usually just a hint of constriction just beyond the short-sheathing leaf base, and many leaves are merely straight-sided. Collections from Maine identified as A. peckii are Amphidium mougeotii.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Comments

This species is recognized by its leaf margins constricted above the leaf base, abaxial superficial cells of costa above the mid-leaf with densely rough papillae, and linear-lanceolate leaves that are contorted when dry.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Anoectangium stracheyanum has been considered to be a synonym of A. aestivum according to the Bryophyte Flora of North America (FNA Vol. 27, 2007), but the authors believe further study shows it to be the distinct Asian species.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!