Overview

Comprehensive Description

Comments

Another common name for this species is Hairy Hawkweed, although this name is also used for Hieracium longipilum. The Hieracium spp. are another group of plants that can be tricky to identify. They fall into two broad groups
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Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Description

This native perennial plant is 1-3' tall, consisting of a rosette of leaves from which a flowering stalk develops. The basal leaves are up to 6" long and 2" across, tapering to a narrow petiole. They are ovate or oblanceolate, usually with smooth margins, and have scattered white hairs that are ½" or less. The flowering stalk is variably hairy, with a few small leaves alternating along the lower half. The upper half of the stalk is either leafless, or has a few tiny leaves that resemble bracts. Generally, the lower stalk is conspicuously hairy (particularly near the bases of the leaves), while the upper stalk has few or no hairs, except where the flowers occur. This stalk terminates in a panicle of composite flowers. Each composite flower is about ½–¾" across, consisting of a head with 15-30 yellow ray florets. The ray florets have tips that are truncated, ending in 5 small teeth. The blooming period is mid-summer to early fall, and lasts about 1-2 months. Beneath the ray florets, there is a cylindrical arrangement of narrow bracts. These bracts are green or purplish green. The slender stems within the panicle have glandular hairs that are ½" or less; like the bracts, these stems are green or purplish green. The florets are eventually replaced by achenes with white or brown tufts of hair. These achenes are spindle-shaped, tapering at both ends; they are dispersed by the wind. The root system consists of a short crown with fibrous roots underneath; sometimes rhizomes are produced, enabling vegetative reproduction. Cultivation
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Range and Habitat in Illinois

Gronovius' Hawkweed is scattered throughout Illinois, except for many counties in the NW and central areas of the state (see Distribution Map). Depending on the area, it is occasional to rare or absent. Habitats include moist to mesic sand prairies, sandy thickets, openings in rocky or sandy woodlands, savannas, bluffs, and edges of fields. Where this plant grows in shade, it is usually taller and grows in drier locations. Where it is sunny, this plant is usually shorter and prefers moister locations.
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants 30–45(–80) cm. Stems proximally piloso-hirsute (hairs 2–4+ mm), sometimes stellate-pubescent as well, distally stellate-pubescent, sometimes piloso-hirsute as well. Leaves: basal 0(–2+), cauline (3–)6–12+; blades elliptic or obovate to oblanceolate, 20–35(–90) × 10–40(–50) mm, lengths 2–4+ times widths, bases cuneate to rounded (sometimes ± clasping), margins entire, apices rounded to acute, abaxial faces piloso-hirsute (hairs 2–4 mm) and stellate-pubescent, adaxial piloso-hirsute. Heads (5–)25–50 in usually narrow, thyrsiform arrays (lengths of arrays usually 3–6+ times diams., sometimes shorter). Peduncles stellate-pubescent and stipitate-glandular. Calyculi: bractlets 8–12+. Involucres cylindric to campanulate, 7–10 mm. Phyllaries 12–15+, apices rounded to acute or acuminate, abaxial faces glabrous or stellate-pubescent, rarely stipitate-glandular as well. Florets 12–20+; corollas yellow, 8–9+ mm. Cypselae urceolate, 3.5–4.5+ mm; pappi of ca. 40+, stramineous bristles in 2+ series, ca. 5 mm.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

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Type Information

Holotype for Hieracium hondurense S.F. Blake
Catalog Number: US 989581
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): S. F. Blake
Year Collected: 1919
Locality: Between La Florida and Hacienda Espiritu Santo., Copán, Honduras, Central America
  • Holotype: Blake, S. F. 1922. Contr. U.S. Natl. Herb. 24: 31.
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© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Holotype for Hieracium panamense S.F. Blake
Catalog Number: US 1083884
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Verified from the card file of type specimens
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): A. Busck
Year Collected: 1911
Locality: Alhajuela., Panama, Central America
  • Holotype: Blake, S. F. 1924. Contr. U.S. Natl. Herb. 22: 658.
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© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

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Ecology

Habitat

Range and Habitat in Illinois

Gronovius' Hawkweed is scattered throughout Illinois, except for many counties in the NW and central areas of the state (see Distribution Map). Depending on the area, it is occasional to rare or absent. Habitats include moist to mesic sand prairies, sandy thickets, openings in rocky or sandy woodlands, savannas, bluffs, and edges of fields. Where this plant grows in shade, it is usually taller and grows in drier locations. Where it is sunny, this plant is usually shorter and prefers moister locations.
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Associations

Faunal Associations

The nectar or pollen of the flowers probably attracts many kinds of insects, including long-tongued bees, short-tongued bees, bee flies, and beetles. The seedheads are eaten by the Wild Turkey, while the foliage is eaten by mammalian herbivores, including deer and rabbits. Photographic Location
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Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Hieracium gronovii

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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