Overview

Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Anisota virginiensis

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 2 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNAGTAGGAACTTCATTAAGATTATTAATTCGAGCAGAATTAGGTACCCCTGGATCTTTAATTGGAGATGATCAAATTTATAATACTATTGTAACAGCTCATGCTTTCATTATAATTTTTTTTATAGTAATGCCTATTATAATTGGAGGATTTGGAAACTGATTAGTTCCATTGATGCTTGGAGCTCCAGATATAGCTTTCCCTCGAATGAATAATATAAGTTTTTGACTATTACCCCCTTCCCTTATTCTTTTAATTTCAAGAAGAATTGTTGAAACCGGAGCTGGTACAGGATGAACAGTTTACCCCCCTCTTTCCTCTAATATTGCTCATGGAGGATCATCTGTAGACTTAGCAATTTTTTCCCTTCACTTAGCTGGAATTTCCTCAATTTTAGGTGCTATTAATTTTATTACCACAATTATTAATATACGTCTTAATAATTTATCTTTTGATCAAATACCATTATTCGTTTGAGCAGTAGGTATTACAGCTTTTCTTCTTCTTTTATCTCTCCCAGTATTAGCAGGAGCAATTACCATACTTCTTACAGATCGAAATTTAAATACCTCCTTCTTTGACCCTGCAGGAGGAGGAGNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
-- end --

Download FASTA File

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Anisota virginiensis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 18
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Anisota virginiensis

Anisota virginiensis, the Pink-Striped Oakworm Moth, is a species of silk moth of the family Saturniidae.

Description[edit]

The female's wings are purplish red with ochre-yellow. They have thin scales and are almost transparent. The male's wings are purplish brown with a large transparent space in the middle.[2] The female is larger than the male. The wing span is 4.2 to 6.6 centimeters.

Habitat[edit]

The moth can be found across Canada from Nova Scotia to southeastern Manitoba,[3] and in the United States. It lives in deciduous woodlands and suburbs.[4]

Biology[edit]

The males attract females by buzzing like a bee. Mating occurs during the morning.[3] It is a rapid process. The male and female stay together for the rest of the day and then the female finds a place to lay eggs, usually under oak leaves.[3]

The caterpillars are gray or greenish with dull brownish yellow or rosy stripes. There are scales on each segment and two long spines on the mesothorax.[2] The caterpillars pupate for a short time.[3] They feed on the foliage of oak trees, maples, birches, and hazels. The caterpillar overwinters in the soil as a pupa. Caterpillars that are newly hatched or are in the middle of growing feed in groups while those that are mature or nearly so feed separately.[5] The caterpillar is about an eighth of an inch long. The head is large in proportion to the body. The inside of the mouth is yellow. The legs are semi-translucent.[6]

Ecology[edit]

Conservation regimes are not required for this species.[4] It is considered a pest of forests because it defoliates trees.[5] Outbreaks can be treated with an arsenical spray.[7]

Life cycle gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Tuskes, Paul M.; P. Tuttle, James; Collins, Michael M. (1996). The wild silk moths of North America: a natural history of the Saturniidae of the United States and Canada. Cornell University Press. p. 250. 
  2. ^ a b Henry Comstock, John; Botsford Comstock, Anna (1899). A manual for the study of insects. Comstock Pub. Co. p. 348. 
  3. ^ a b c d M. Tuskes, Paul; P. Tuttle, James; M. Collins, Michael (1996). The wild silk moths of North America: a natural history of the Saturniidae of the United States and Canada. Cornell University Press. pp. 74–75. ISBN 978-0-8014-3130-2. 
  4. ^ a b "Pink-striped oakworm moth Anisota virginiensis (Drury, 1773)". Butterflies and Moths of North America. Retrieved 2010-05-29. 
  5. ^ a b L. Hyche, L. "Pinkstriped Oakworm Anisota virginiensis (Drury) (Saturniidae)". Auburn University. Retrieved 2010-05-29. 
  6. ^ Entomological Society of Ontario; Ontario. Dept. of Agriculture; Ontario. Legislative Assembly (1908). Annual report, Volumes 38-41. The Society. p. 74. 
  7. ^ Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station (1914). Bulletin on Forestry, Volume 1, Issues 156-435. p. 32. 
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: It is possible that discolor, which Tuskes et al. (1996) treat as a synonym is a subspecies or sibling species as other authors have treated it. Authors prior to Tuskes et al.(1996) generally recognized pellucida as a subspecies or even species. Populations from southern New Jersey to eastern North Carolina are somewhat transitional but there seems to be a fairly abrupt shift in phenotype starting in coastal South Carolina. See Ferguson (1971). However, the shift from one brood to two occurs in about eastern Virginia and southern Delaware (Schweitzer) and so does not coincide with subspecies pellucida.

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