Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Description

Chiefly marine; rarely brackish. Distribution: Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific. Supramaxilla small, if present. Branchiostegal rays 12-26, except the neotenic Bathysaurus mollis with 8. Vertebrae 49-63. Non-hermaphroditic, except Bathysaurus.
  • MASDEA (1997).
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:952Public Records:296
Specimens with Sequences:781Public Species:29
Specimens with Barcodes:759Public BINs:45
Species:69         
Species With Barcodes:67         
          
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Barcode data

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Synodontidae

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Wikipedia

Synodontidae

The lizardfish (or typical lizardfish to distinguish them from the Bathysauridae and Pseudotrichonotidae) are a family, the Synodontidae, of aulopiform fishes. They are found in tropical and subtropical marine waters throughout the world.

Lizardfish are generally small fish, although the largest species are about 60 cm (24 in) long. They have slender, somewhat cylindrical bodies, and heads that resemble those of lizards. The dorsal fin is located in the middle of the back, and accompanied by a small adipose fin placed closer to the tail.[2] They have mouths full of sharp teeth, even on the tongue.[1]

They are bottom-dwelling fish, living in shallow coastal waters; even the deepest-dwelling lizardfish lives in waters no more than 400 m (1,300 ft) deep. Some species in the subfamily Harpadontinae even live in brackish estuaries. They prefer sandy environments, and typically have body colours that help to camouflage them in such environments.[2]

The larvae of lizardfishes are free-swimming. They are distinguished by the presence of black blotches in their guts, clearly visible through their transparent, scaleless, skin.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2008). "Synodontidae" in FishBase. December 2008 version.
  2. ^ a b c Johnson, R.K. & Eschmeyer, W.N. (1998). Paxton, J.R. & Eschmeyer, W.N., ed. Encyclopedia of Fishes. San Diego: Academic Press. pp. 123–124. ISBN 0-12-547665-5. 
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