Overview

Brief Summary

Cyperaceae is a plant family commonly known as the sedges, which is comprised of approximately 5500 species. Stems are unjointed and typically triangular in cross section, with solid pith throughout. Leaves are three-ranked or tristichous. Fruits are in the form of an achene or nut.

Species most commonly occur in wetlands, although some are found in upland locations, and in some cases are obtrusive to crops; Benzothiadiazoles are typically the herbicides of choice to control unwanted Cyperaceae.
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Comprehensive Description

Description

Annual or perennial herbs, usually most abundant in wet places. Culms usually triangular, usually solid. Leaves: alternate, usually 3-ranked, simple, grass-like or reduced to sheaths; sheath usually closedligule usually 0; lamina usually linear or setaceous. Inflorescence consisting of numerous spikelets, usually arranged in an anthela or panicle, often ± umbellate and subtended by leaf-like bracts. Flowers bisexual or unisexual, arising in the axils of a single bract (glume) without a bracteole, or in tribe Cariceae, the female flowers surrounded by a closed utricle. Glumes usually spirally arranged in 1-many-flowered spikelets. Perianth (only present in the tribes Scirpeae and Rhynchosporeae) consisting of 3-6 (rarely more) hairs, bristles or scales, in other tribes 0. Stamens (1-)2-3; anthers basifixed. Ovary superior, 1-locular with 1 erect ovule. Style simple; stigmas 2 or 3. Fruit a 1-seeded nut, biconvex or trigonous. Seeds free from the pericarp.
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Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Distribution

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Cyperaceae Juss.:
Colombia (South America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
  • Idárraga-Piedrahita, A., R. D. C. Ortiz, R. Callejas Posada & M. Merello. 2011. Flora de Antioquia. Catálogo de las Plantas Vasculares, vol. 2. Listado de las Plantas Vasculares del Departamento de Antioquia. Pp. 1-939.   http://www.tropicos.org/Reference/100008595 External link.
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Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / open feeder
larva of Dolerus asper grazes on leaf of Cyperaceae

Foodplant / open feeder
larva of Dolerus megapterus grazes on leaf of Cyperaceae

Foodplant / open feeder
larva of Dolerus nitens grazes on leaf of Cyperaceae
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Foodplant / open feeder
larva of Dolerus possilensis grazes on leaf of Cyperaceae
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Plant / resting place / within
adult of Haplothrips aculeatus may be found in live flower of Cyperaceae
Remarks: season: 8-9

Foodplant / open feeder
nocturnal larva of Macrophya duodecimpunctata grazes on leaf of Cyperaceae

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Resinomycena saccharifera is saprobic on dead, decayed debris of Cyperaceae
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / open feeder
larva of Selandria serva grazes on leaf of Cyperaceae

Foodplant / open feeder
larva of Selandria sixii grazes on leaf of Cyperaceae

Foodplant / open feeder
nocturnal larva of Tenthredopsis nassata grazes on leaf of Cyperaceae

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:7,498Public Records:3,366
Specimens with Sequences:5,818Public Species:1,058
Specimens with Barcodes:5,700Public BINs:0
Species:1,519         
Species With Barcodes:1,374         
          
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cyperaceae A.guadamuz368

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Cyperaceae

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Wikipedia

Cyperaceae

Cyperaceae!<-- This template has to be "warmed up" before it can be used, for some reason -->

Cyperaceae is a family of monocotyledonous flowering plants known as sedges, which superficially resemble grasses or rushes. The family is large, with some 5,500 species described in about 109 genera (Govaerts et al., 2007). These species are widely distributed, with the centers of diversity for the group occurring in tropical Asia and tropical South America. While sedges may be found growing in all kinds of situations, many are associated with wetlands, or with poor soils.

Ecological communities dominated by sedges are known as sedgelands.

Features distinguishing members of the sedge family from grasses or rushes are that members of the sedge family have stems with triangular cross-sections (with occasional exceptions), and their leaves are spirally arranged in three ranks (grasses have alternate leaves forming two ranks).[1][2][3]

Some well-known sedges include the water chestnut (Eleocharis dulcis) and the papyrus sedge (Cyperus papyrus), from which the Ancient Egyptian writing material was made. This family also includes cotton-grass (Eriophorum), spike-rush (Eleocharis), sawgrass (Cladium), nutsedge or nutgrass (Cyperus rotundus, a common lawn weed), the large genus of Carex, and white star sedge (Rhynchospora colorata).

Selected genera

Broad-leaved Cotton-grass (Eriophorum latifolium)

References

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