Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Trees, shrubs or suffrutices. Stipules present, caducous (in ours). Leaves simple, entire, alternate, usually with 2 glands at the base of the lamina or apex of petiole. Flowers bisexual, slightly zygomorphic (in ours), perigynous. Sepals 5. Petals 5. Stamens 2-many. Ovary superior with 3 carpels, one of which fully develops; each carpel 1- or 2-locular. Fruit a fleshy drupe.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:292Public Records:198
Specimens with Sequences:259Public Species:90
Specimens with Barcodes:254Public BINs:0
Species:119         
Species With Barcodes:109         
          
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Chrysobalanaceae

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Chrysobalanaceae

Chrysobalanaceae is a family of trees, shrubs and flowering plants, consisting of 17 genera and about 460 species of leptocaul that grows in the Tropics or is subtropical and common in the Americas.[2] Some of the species contain silica in their bodies for rigidity and so the mesophyll often has sclerencymatous idioblasts. The flower produces a plum-like fruit and the plant is commonly known as a coco plum.

It was traditionally placed as a subfamily in the rose family or as a family in the rose order and exceptionally as an order in Myrtiflorae by Dahlgren[3][4] In the phenotypic cladistic analysis of Nandi et al., it branched with Eleagnaceae as sister group of Polygalaceae, in their molecular cladistic analysis it was in Malpighiales and also in their combined analysis.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Angiosperm Phylogeny Group (2009). "An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants: APG III" (PDF). Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 161 (2): 105–121. doi:10.1111/j.1095-8339.2009.00996.x. Retrieved 2013-06-26. 
  2. ^ Stephens, P.F. (2001 onwards). Angiosperm Phylogeny Website. Version 9, June 2008. http://www.mobot.org/MOBOT/Research/APweb/
  3. ^ Brummit, R.K. 1992. Vascular Plant Families and Genera. Kew.
  4. ^ Lawrence, George. 1960. Taxonomy of Vascular Plants. Macmillan, NY.
  5. ^ Nandi, O.L., Chase, M.W., & Endress, P.K. 1998. A combined c1adistic analysis of angiosperms using rbcL and non-molecular data sets. Ann. Missouri Bol. Gard. 85: 137-212(docstoc.com).
  • F. Carnevale Neto et al.: Chrysobalanaceae: secondary metabolites, ethnopharmacology and pharmacological potential, "Phytochemistry Reviews" (online), 2012, [1].


Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!