The following bibliography has been generated by bringing together all references provided by our content partners. There may be duplication.

References

  • Banks, R. C., R. W. McDiarmid, A. L. Gardner, and W. C. Starnes. 2003. Checklist of Vertebrates of the United States, the U.S. Territories, and Canada
  • Banks, R. C., R. W. McDiarmid, and A. L. Gardner. 1987. Checklist of Vertebrates of the United States, the U.S. Territories, and Canada. Resource Publication, no. 166. 79
  • Friesen, V. L., D. J. Anderson, T. E. Steeves, H. Jones, and E. A. Schreiber. 2002. Molecular support for the species status of the Nazca Booby (Sula granti). Auk 119: 820-826.
  • Friesen, V. L., and D. J. Anderson. 1997. Phylogeny and evolution of the Sulidae (Aves: Pelecaniformes): a test of alternative modes of speciation. Molecular Phylogentics and Evolution 7: 252-260.
  • Nelson, J. B. 1978. The Sulidae: Gannets and Boobies. Oxford University Press, Oxford.
  • Pitman, R. L., and J. R. Jehl. 1998. Geographic variation and reassessment of species limits in the "Masked" Boobies of the eastern Pacific Ocean. Wilson Society Bulletin 110: 155-170.
  • Steeves, T. E., D. J. Anderson, H. McNally, M. H. Kim, and V. L. Friesen. 2003. Phylogeography of Sula: the role of physical barriers to gene flow in the diversification of tropical seabirds. Journal of Avian Biology 34: 217-223.
  • Steeves, T. E., D. J. Anderson, and V. L. Friesen. 2005a. A role for nonphysical barriers to gene flow in the diversification of a highly vagile seabird, the masked booby (Sula dactylatra). Molecular Ecology 14: 3877-3887.
  • Steeves, T. E., D. J. Anderson, and V. L. Friesen. 2005b. The Isthmus of Panama: a major physical barrier to gene flow in a highly mobile pantropical seabird. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 18: 1000-1008.
  • WoRMS (2014). Sulidae. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=136994
  • van Tets, G. F., Meredith, C. W., Fullager, P. J. and Davidson, P. M. 1988. Osteological differences between Sula and Morus, and a description of an extinct new species of Sula from Lord Howe and Norfolk Islands, Tasman Sea. Notornis 35:35-37.

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