Overview

Distribution

Continent: Caribbean
Distribution: Puerto Rico, Isla Mona, Isla Desecheo, British Virgin Islands (e.g. Anegada)  Alsophis portoricensis portoricensis: widely distributed in Puerto Rico (including Cayo Santiago) except southern third of island and extreme west.   Alsophis portoricensis anegadae (HOLOTYPE MCZ 12083): British Virgin Is.   Alsophis portoricensis aphantus (HOLOTYPE BMNH RR1964.944): Isla Vieques.   Alsophis portoricensis nicholsi (HOLOTYPE UMMZ 80648): Buck Island of the Capella Islands off south coast of St. Thomas, U. S. Virgin Is.   Alsophis portoricensis prymnus (HOLOTYPE MCZ 77226): Caja de Muertos; Platillo; southern Puerto Rico.   Alsophis portoricensis richardi (HOLOTYPE USNM 66522): Isla Culebra, St. Thomas and its satellites, Lovango Cay, Peter I., SaltI.  
Type locality: Puerto Rico.
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© Peter Uetz

Source: The Reptile Database

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Ecology

Associations

Known predators

Alsophis portoricensis is prey of:
Buteo jamaicensis
Otus nudipes
Diptera
Secernentia nematodes

Based on studies in:
Puerto Rico, El Verde (Rainforest)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Waide RB, Reagan WB (eds) (1996) The food web of a tropical rainforest. University of Chicago Press, Chicago
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Known prey organisms

  • Waide RB, Reagan WB (eds) (1996) The food web of a tropical rainforest. University of Chicago Press, Chicago
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Wikipedia

Borikenophis portoricensis

Borikenophis portoricensis[1] (Vernacular Spanish: Culebra Corredora;[2] Vernacular English: Puerto Rican racer[3]) is a snake that grows to 3 feet.

Appearance and range[edit]

It slinks around in the trees of the Toro Negro State Forest. Its body sports a solid brown color with each of his scales edged by a darker brown. Like the forest's other various garden snakes, it is a daytime hunter.[4] The Puerto Rican Racer is endemic to the island of Puerto Rico. It is capable of inflicting a venomous bite.[5]


See also[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Uetz, Peter; Hallermann, Jakob. "Borikenophis portoricensis". The Reptile Database. Retrieved 11 September 2013. 
  2. ^ Volume 1: Land Cover, Vertebrate Species Distributions, and Land Stewardship. William A. Gould, Caryl Alarcón, Brick Fevold, Michael E. Jiménez, Sebastián Martinuzzi, Gary Potts, Maya Quiñones, Mariano Solórzano, and Eduardo Ventosa. The Puerto Rico Gap Analysis Project. (Publication Number: IITF-GTR-39) USDA. Forest Service. International Institute of Tropical Forestry. March 2008. Page 140. Retrieved 18 August 2013.
  3. ^ 2007 Wildlife Facts - Puerto Rican Racer. USDA. Forest Service. "El Yunque National Forest." Retrieved 26 August 2013.
  4. ^ Animals in the Toro Negro Forest. Amy M. Armstrong. Demand Media. Retrieved 30 July 2013.
  5. ^ Is the Puerto Rican racer, Alsophis portoricensis, really harmless? A case report series. García-Gubern C., Bello R., Rivera V., Rocafort A., Colon-Rolon L., Acosta-Tapia H. (Department of Emergency Medicine, Hospital San Lucas, Ponce School of Medicine, Ponce, Puerto Rico.) 2010. Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. (Wilderness Environ Med. 2010 Dec; 21(4):353-6. doi: 10.1016/j.wem.2010.07.001. Epub 2010 Aug 5.) Retrieved 29 July 2013.

Further reading[edit]

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